Department of English

University of Toronto

2017 Summer Courses

 

2017 Summer Graduate Course Timetable

& Course Descriptions*


NB: ROSI/Acorn Enrolment for Graduate English Summer Courses opens on April 3, 2017.

Scroll down to Course Descriptions.  Please note specific dates below. (*NOTE: Room locations, Timetable & course information may be subject to changes.)

Time

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

11am–1pm

ENG4808HF

Public Health Stories:

Writing Illness in

Nineteenth-Century

Britain

A. Charise

2 hours

Rm. JHB 718

NB: NO CLASS ON MONDAY, JUNE 19

(Make-up class scheduled for following TUES., JUNE 20)

NB: MAKE-UP CLASS ONE DATE ONLY: TUES., JUNE 20

ENG4808HF

Public Health Stories:

Writing Illness in

Nineteenth-Century

Britain

A. Charise

2 hours

Rm. JHB 718

ENG4808HF

Public Health Stories:

Writing Illness in

Nineteenth-Century

Britain

A. Charise

2 hours

Rm. JHB 718

Make-up classes:

10:00 am to 12:00 noon, on Friday, June 2, and Friday, June 9, ONLY, in the Media Commons Film Screening Room at Robarts Library

ENG5731HF

Transitional Justice

and Indigenous

Writing in Canada

C. Suzack

2 hours

1pm–2pm

2pm–4pm

ENG1009HF

Writing the Nation:

Pre-Modern

Historiographies

S. Akbari

2 hours

Rm. LI 301

ENG1009HF

Writing the Nation:

Pre-Modern

Historiographies

S. Akbari

2 hours

Rm. LI 301

4pm–6pm

6pm-8pm   

ENG5731HF

Transitional Justice

and Indigenous

Writing in Canada

C. Suzack

2 hours

Rm. JHB 718

NB: NO CLASS ON MONDAY,  MAY 15 or MONDAY, June 26

(Make-up classes are scheduled for Friday, June 2, 10am-12noon and Friday, June 9, 10am-12noon in the Media Commons Film Screening Room at Robarts Library)

ENG5731HF       

Transitional Justice

and Indigenous

Writing in Canada   

C. Suzack   

2 hours   

Rm. JHB 718 

6pm-9pm   

ENG5963HF

James Joyce:

Modernism,

Modernity, Mythology

G. Leonard

3 hours

Rm. JHB 718

ENG5963HF   

James Joyce:

Modernism,

Modernity, Mythology

G. Leonard

3 hours

Rm. JHB 718

 

2017 Summer Graduate Course Descriptions


ENG1009HF
Writing the Nation: Pre-Modern Historiographies
S. Akbari

Pre-modern English writers had several models for thinking about the past, ranging from the Virgilian narrative of the rise and fall of great nations to the Orosian pattern of translatio imperii. Whether focused on nation or empire, however, the writing of history has always had as its goal the effort to impose form on the potentially chaotic fragments of the past. Nowhere is this effort more visible than in the great moments of punctuation: not just the succession of one nation by another in the sequence of imperial rule, but in the destabilizing rupture of revolution and apocalypse. This course focuses on the tension between the matter of history and the form of chronicle, and considers the role of poetics in mediating the movement of history into literature. To this end, we will juxtapose histories written and read in medieval England with literature of the Middle Ages, concluding with a glance forward into early modern narratives of the English nation. studies.

Course Reading List
Texts will include: Virgil, Aeneid and Chaucer, House of Fame, book I; Statius, Thebaid and Chaucer, Knight’s Tale; Joseph of Exeter, Ylias and Chaucer, Troilus and Criseyde; Orosius, Seven Books of History against the Pagans and Higden and Trevisa, Polychronicon; Froissart, Chronicle and Gower, Vox clamantis, book I; Foxe, Book of Martyrs and Milton, History of Britain

Course Method of Evaluation and Course Requirements:
C
lass participation and several short presentations (40%); abstract (10%); final research paper (50%).

Summer F-Term (May 16 - June 22, 2017)
Day/Time Tuesday and Thursday, 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm, 2 hour classes
Location: Room LI 301 (Lillian Massey Building 125 Queen's Park, 3rd Floor)
   

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ENG4808HF
Public Health Stories: Writing Illness in Nineteenth-Century Britain
A. Charise

Course Description
This course focuses on nineteenth-century illness as both an individual and epidemiological phenomenon, with emphasis on how fictional and non-fictional writing of this period reveals 1) conceptual contiguities between nineteenth-century disease, the body, and the body politic, and 2) the reciprocally illuminating relationship between literature and health. We will use the passing of the 1848 Public Health Bill as a chimerical touchstone: as a historical turning point in the social reform of public health, and as a critical strategy of periodization for re-writing illness narratives as inscriptions of health that speak to, and out of, the nineteenth-century public sphere. On one hand we will approach literary and extra-literary writings of this time as discursive scenes of public engagement with health and illness, yet we will also assess the utility of theoretical frameworks drawn from the late twentieth- and twenty-first century interdisciplinary field of medical or health humanities. How do our own contemporary interests in illness elucidate, dramatize—or misdiagnose—the aesthetic forms, conceptual problems, and ethical impulses of nineteenth-century illness writing? Although our readings focus on texts of the British nineteenth century, this course will also appeal to students with interests in health humanities, medical history, and interdisciplinary literary studies.

Course Reading List
Literary texts will include: Bulwer-Lytton, “On Ill Health and Its Consolations”; Bloomfield, “Good Tidings, or, News from the Farm: A Poem”; Chadwick, Report on the Sanitary Condition of the Labouring Population (selections); Collins, Heart and Science; Conan Doyle, “The Adventure of the Dying Detective,” “The Man with the Twisted Lip”; de Quincey, Confessions; Dickens, Bleak House; Henley, In Hospital; Kingsley, “The Science of Health”; Lewes, “Training in Relation to Health”; Whiting, Memoirs of a Stomach; Martineau, Life in the Sickroom; Montagu, “Town Eclogues: Saturday; The Small-Pox”; Nightingale, Notes on Nursing (selections); Seacole, The Wonderful Adventures of Mrs. Seacole in Many Lands (selections); Kipling, “The Last of the Light Brigade.”
Theoretical texts will include selections from: Foucault, The Birth of the Clinic; Frank, The Wounded Storyteller; Kleinman, The Illness Narratives; Woolf, On Being Ill; Latour, “Why Has Critique Run Out of Steam? Matters of Fact to Matters of Concern”; Vrettos, Somatic Fictions; Bailin, The Sickroom in Victorian Fiction; Carpenter, Health, Medicine, and Society in Victorian England; Shuttleton, Smallpox and the Literary Imagination, 1660–1820.

Course Method of Evaluation and Course Requirements:
Includes brief seminar presentation (methodological/theoretical) (20%), participation (10%), in-class conference paper and response (20%), final research paper (50%).

Summer F-Term (May 15 - June 26, 2017; NB: no classes May 22, Victoria Day, or Monday, June 19; Make-up Class on TUESDAY, JUNE 20)
Day/Time Monday and Wednesday,  11:00 am - 1:00 pm, 2 hours classes
Location: Room JHB 718 (Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street)   

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ENG5731HF
Transitional Justice and Indigenous Writing in Canada
C. Suzack

Course Description:
Transitional justice represents a legal and political paradigm that examines the social justice goals of adversely-affected communities. Taking as their object of analysis the “justice gap” that exists as a consequence of the breakdown in a community’s social order, transitional justice paradigms focus on periods of reform within countries that have suffered massive human rights abuses in order to provide mechanisms that address the “rights of victims, build civic trust, and establish and strengthen democratic law practices” (ICTJ, “What is Transitional Justice?”).

In this course we will explore how transitional justice paradigms apply to Indigenous communities in Canada. We will examine literary texts in order to scrutinize the social justice issues that Indigenous authors raise and consider the “justice gap” that exists in using literary texts to explore social justice issues. As human rights scholar Julie Mertus explains, “Most survivors … do not see themselves in the work of judicial processes … There is no crime of destruction of souls, deprivation of childhood, erasure of dreams.” Our objectives will be to ask how literary texts further the goals of social justice practices and to analyze how literary expression contributes to our understanding concerning the justice issues that Indigenous community’s experience.

Course Reading List:
a) Charles Altieri, The Particulars of Rapture: An Aesthetics of the Affects. Ithaca: Cornell UP, 2003.
b) Ruti Teitel, Transitional Justice. Oxford and New York: Oxford UP, 2002. (selections)
c) Julie Mertus, “Truth in a Box: The Limits of Justice through Judicial Mechanisms.” The Politics of Memory: Truth, Healing & Social Justice. Ed. Ifi Amadiume & Abdullahi An-Na’im. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 2000.
d) Paige Arthur. “How ‘Transitions’ Reshaped Human Rights: A Conceptual History of Transitional Justice.” Human Rights Quarterly 31 (2009): 321-367.
e) Highway, Tomson. Kiss of the Fur Queen, 1998.
f) Housty, William. “NEB on Heiltsuk Culture, Threat of Oil Spill.” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4UOouXAwmPE, 2012.
g) Johnston, Basil. Indian School Days, 1988.
h) Courtney Jung, “Canada and the Legacy of the Indian Residential Schools: Transitional Justice for Indigenous People in a Nontransitional Society.” Identities in Transition: Challenges for Transitional Justice in Divided Societies. Ed. Paige Arthur. Cambridge University Press, 2013. 217-250.
i) Chrystos, Not Vanishing. Vancouver: Press Gang, 1988.
j) Louise Halfe, Bear Bones & Feathers. Regina: Coteau, 1994.

Method of Evaluation and Course Requirements:
Position Papers 40%
Research Essay 40%
Participation 20%

Summer F-Term (May 15 - June 26, 2017; NB: no classes May 22, Victoria Day)
Day/Time Monday and Wednesday, 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm, 2 hour classes
Location: Room JHB 718 (Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street).
NB: NO CLASS ON MONDAY, MAY 15 or MONDAY, June 26 (Make-up classes are scheduled for Friday, June 2, 10:00 am-12:00 noon and Friday, June 9, 10:00 am-12:00 noon in the Media Commons Film Screening Room at Robarts Library)

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ENG5963HF
James Joyce: Modernism, Modernity, Mythology
G. Leonard

Course Description:
Joyce's biographer, Richard Ellmann, once remarked "we are still learning to be Joyce's contemporaries." It's an observation Joyce might well have been pleased to hear if we judge from this note he sent to his publisher in an effort to get his first work, Dubliners, published: "I seriously believe that you will retard the course of civilisation in Ireland by, preventing the Irish people from having one good look at themselves in my nicely polished looking-glass." A character in Ulysses remarks, "Shakespeare is the happy hunting ground of all minds that have lost their balance". In a similar manner, Joyce's fiction has been the happy hunting ground of literary critics and theorists seeking to maintain their balance. No literary theory of the past 50 years has failed to touch down at some point on Joyce's work. As a result it is sometimes difficult to approach the fiction as something other than a paradigm of any number of methodologies. This seminar will not entirely avoid that fate, and student seminar presentations/discussions will be designed to interrogate the strengths and weaknesses of various approaches, and yet our primary question will be what did Joyce think he was doing in writing these stories and novels, and what does he appear to have accomplished in doing so? Orienting one's reading of a text through authorial intention has always been a problematic approach to say the least, and yet Joyce went out of his way, time and time again, to present himself as someone on a mission, someone who must not be stopped unless we seek "to retard the course of civilisation". His character Stephen Dedalus is no less messianic: "I go to encounter for the millionth time the reality of experience and to forge in the smithy of my soul the uncreated conscience of my race." Youthful hubris? Probably. But, given what Joyce accomplished, also pretty much on the mark. Accordingly, while we will encounter and review all the major approaches in this seminar, we will also maintain an interest throughout in "the reality of experience" Stephen set out to encounter, especially as it pertains to the formation of an aesthetic that would become modernism --an aesthetic forged, in large part, in the "smithy" of what we now call modernity. More specifically, this "smithy" included the rise of advertising and commodity culture, the birth of a new Art form (cinema), and the corresponding explosion of form and content in futurism, dadaism surrealism, and impressionism.

The texts for Dubliners, A Portrait of the Artist as a young Man and Ulysses will be ordered at the Bob Miller bookstore. A packet will be prepared with selections gleaned from the bibliography below.

Course Reading List:
BIBLIOGRAPHY
I. MODERNITY
Berman, Marshall. All that is solid melts into air: the experience of modernity. 1987.
Charney, Leo. Cinema and the invention of modern life.
Felski, Rita. The gender of modernity
Fornäs, Johan. Consuming media: communication, shopping and everyday life. 2007.
Gillespie, Michael Allen. The theological origins of modernity.
Gilroy, Paul. The Black Atlantic: Modernity and Double Consciousness, 1995.
Jameson, Fredric. A singular modernity: essay on the ontology of the present. 2002.
Misa, Thomas J. Modernity and Technology.
Smart, Barry. ¬Facing modernity: ambivalence, reflexivity and morality, 1999 ----------------

II. JAMES JOYCE
Attridge, Derek. The Cambridge companion to James Joyce
Ellmann, Richard. James Joyce (New York: Oxford University Press, 1959)
Herr, Cheryl. Joyce's Anatomy of Culture
Joyce, Stanislaus. My Brother's Keeper: James Joyce's Early Years
Kershner, R.B. Joyce, Bakhtin, and Popular Literature: Chronicles of Disorder
Leonard, Garry. Advertising and commodity culture in Joyce. ------------------. Reading Dubliners again: a Lacanian perspective
North, Michael. Reading 1922: A Return to the Scene of the Modern

III. MODERNISM:
Armstrong, Tim. Modernism: a cultural history
Caws, Mary Ann. Manifesto: a century of isms
Caughie, Pamela L. Disciplining Modernism.
Kolocoroni, Vassiliki. Modernism: an anthology of sources and documents
Levenson, Michael Harry. The Cambridge companion to modernism
Nicholls, Peter. Modernisms: a literary guide
Whitworth, Michael H. Modernism.

Course Method of Evaluation and Course Requirements:
10 % Participation (weekly two page position papers); 20% Twenty Minute Presentations followed by student-led discussion; 70% Final essay. 20 pages.

Summer F-Term (May 16 - June 29, 2017; NB: No classes on June 20 or June 22)
Day/Time Tuesday and Thursday, 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm, 3 hour classes
Location: Room JHB 718 (Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street).

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