Department of English

University of Toronto

5000 Series Course Descriptions

ENG5006HF
Modernism and the Politics of Form
A. Hammond

Course Description: 
In recent years, critics working under the loose banner of “new formalism” have brought renewed attention to the social uses of literary form. Pushing back against conceptions of formalist criticism as ahistorical, totalizing, and tending to ideological mystification, these critics adopt a historical approach to form, showing how styles and genres emerge out of political contexts and in turn shape possibilities for thought, expression, and action in a given historical moment. This course tests the claims of new formalism through an investigation of modernism, among the most formally inventive and formally self-conscious of literary periods. Reading modernist writers like Gertrude Stein, Virginia Woolf, Djuna Barnes, and Wyndham Lewis alongside modernist critics such as Mikhail Bakhtin, Erich Auerbach, William Empson and representatives of Russian Formalism, the Frankfurt School, and Socialist Realism, we will assess the impact of particular styles in light of specific political intents and historical circumstances. Reading modernism through the new formalist approaches of contemporary critics like Caroline Levine, C. Namwali Serpell, and Susan Wolfson, we will ask how much in new formalism is truly “new,” and how much a return to the concerns of modernists.

Course Reading List:
Theodor Adorno, Walter Benjamin, Ernst Bloch, Berolt Brecht, and Georg Lukacs, Aesthetics and Politics (selections)
Mulk Raj Anand, Untouchable
Erich Auerbach, Mimesis
W. H. Auden, Paid on Both Sides
Mikhail Bakhtin, The Dialogic Imagination (selections)
Djuna Barnes, Nightwood
Heather Dubrow, "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner?"
T. S. Eliot, Sweeney Agonistes, selected criticism
William Empson, Seven Types of Ambiguity
James Joyce, "Anna Livia Plurabelle"
Caroline Levine, Forms
Wyndham Lewis, Tarr, Time and Western Man (selections)
Alan Liu, "The Power of Formalism"
Mina Loy, The Lost Lunar Baedeker
C. Namwali Serpell, Seven Modes of Uncertainty
Viktor Shklovsky, selections
Gertrude Stein, Tender Buttons, Composition as Explanation
Richard Strier, "How Formalism Became a Dirty Word, and Why We Can't Do without It."
Jean Toomer, Cane
Edmund Wilson, Axel's Castle (selections)
Susan J. Wolfson, "Reading for Form"
Virginia Woolf, The Waves, "Mr. Bennett and Mrs. Brown," "Poetry, Fiction, and the Future," "The Leaning Tower"
Andrei Zhdanov et al., Problems of Soviet Literature: Reports and Speeches at the First Soviet Writers' Congress.
(This reading list is subject to revision)

Course Method of Evaluation and Requirements:

Participation (20%); Presentation (15%); Response papers (15%); Final research paper (50%)

Term: F-Term (Fall or First Term:  September - December 2018)
Date/Time: Thursdays, 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm, 2 hours
Location: Room JHB TBA (Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street)

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ENG5020HS
#BlackLivesMatter: Contemporary Black Canadian Literature
K. Vernon

Course Description: 
In this course we focus on contemporary black Canadian literature in order to illuminate the current context of black life and political  struggle in Canada. We will read a selection of generically-diverse work by contemporary black Canadian writers, including short stories, poetry, drama, fantasy, historical fiction, and cultural criticism that brings forward a range of histories and contexts that are all too often left out of media representations of black Canadian life. Writing by contemporary authors reveals how histories of slavery, dispossession, erasure and rebellion continue to be alive and part of the present, structuring our social relations still. This work opens up a broad field of inquiry. We will turn our attention to such questions as: how are writers reimagining the place of blackness within and without Canada? How are black writers transforming the meanings of blackness by reframing dominant imaginings of black history, intellectual life and sexuality? What role does art play in black political movements? What political alliances can we form with Indigenous nations in the collective struggle to decolonize? Finally, and most importantly, how do contemporary black Canadian writers imagine worlds that broaden the horizon of black freedom?

Course Reading List:
Primary Texts (subject to change):
Austin Clarke, selected short stories
Dionne Brand, Land to Light On (1997)
Lorena Gale, Angelique (1998)
Nalo Hopkinson, Brown Girl in the Ring (1998)
George Elliott Clarke, George and Rue (2005)
Lawrence Hill, The Book of Negroes (2007)
NourbeSe Philip, Zong! (2008)
Cecily Nicholson, From The Poplars (2014)
Wayde Compton, The Outer Harbour (2015)
Critical Material (subject to change):
Frontiers: Selected Essays and Writings on Racism and Culture 1984-1992. NourbeSe Philip (1992)
We're Rooted Here & They Can't Pull Us Up. P. Bristow, L. Carty, A. Cooper, S. Hamilton, A. Shadd (1994)
A Map to the Door of No Return. Dionne Brand (2001)
Black Like Who? Rinaldo Walcott (1997)
Odysseys Home: Mapping African-Canadian Literature. George Elliott Clarke (2002)
Black Geographies and the Politics of Place. Katherine McKittrick (Editor), Clyde Woods (2007)
After Canaan: Essays on Race, Writing and Region. Wayde Compton (2010)

Course Method of Evaluation and Requirements:
Reader Responses (25%); Participation (10%); Conference-Length Presentation (30%); Article-Length Paper (35%).

Term: S-Term (Spring or Second Term: January - April 2019)
Date/Time: Fridays, 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm, 2 hours
Location: Room JHB TBA (Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street)

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ENG5022HS
Race, Psychoanalysis, and American Literature
N. Morgenstern

Course Description: 
“The resistance of ‘race’ to psychoanalysis may have its origin in psychoanalysis’s resistance to ‘race.’ But to put it in these terms is to suggest that such resistances are eminently open to psychoanalytic investigation” (Johnson). What conceptual tools does psychoanalysis offer us for thinking “race” critically? And how does thinking about race shift and enrich psychoanalytic discourse? We will begin the course with an examination of the long relationship between psychoanalysis and American literature, and we will aim to explore a range of psychoanalytic approaches (Freudian, Lacanian, Laplanchean, Kristevan, Kleinian, Winnicottian). We will read literary texts by Douglass, Hawthorne, Melville, Crane, Larsen, Morrison, Whitehead, Ward and others. And explore a range of psychoanalytic concepts including traumatic repetition, phobia, fetishism, mourning and melancholia, transference, the Imaginary, the Symbolic, and the Real, the enigmatic signifier, transitional objects and phenonomena. We will also read essays by contemporary literary critics who can model for us different ways of undertaking literary psychoanalytic work. This course aims to encourage the participation of those with no previous knowledge of psychoanalysis, as well as students who may have a particular interest in the field.

Course Reading List:  
Adam Phillips (ed), The Freud Reader D.W. Winnicott, Playing and Reality Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass Nathaniel Hawthorne, Selected Tales and Sketches Herman Melville, Billy Budd, Bartleby and Other Stories Edgar Allan Poe, The Fall of the House of Usher and Other Writings Stephen Crane, “The Monster” Nella Larsen, Quicksand and Passing Toni Morrison, Beloved and A Mercy Toni Morrison, Playing in the Dark Colson Whitehead, Zone One Jesmyn Ward, Salvage The Bones A range of psychoanalytic essays available through PEP-Web (Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing)

Course Requirements and Method of Evaluation:
Seminar Participation (TBA); Oral Presentation (TBA); Essay Proposal (TBA); Final Essay (TBA)  

Term: S-Term (Spring or Second Term: January - April 2019)
Date/Time: Thursdays, 10:00 am - 12:00 pm, 2 hours
Location: Room JHB TBA (Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street)

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ENG5046HS
Settler Colonialism and U.S. Literary Studies
M. Gniadek

Course Description:
The term “settler colonialism” has been used to conceptualize the histories of nations like Canada, Australia, and New Zealand for decades.  But recently the term has also been widely used in U.S. contexts.  In this course we will trace the recent emergence of the settler colonial paradigm in U.S. academic discourse, and we’ll consider whether and how it is actually a departure from earlier work.  Our focus will be on literature from the colonial period through the nineteenth century (requiring us to re-think the phrase “U.S. Literary Studies” in our course title) and we will read these texts in conversation with a range of scholarly engagements with imperialism, empire, and settler colonialism.  What kinds of thinking and reading does the idea of settler colonialism allow for American/U.S. literatures that other ways of engaging histories and texts might not?  What are its limitations?

Course Reading List:
Primary texts considered may include works by William Bradford, Roger Williams, Charles Brockden Brown, William Apess, Black Hawk, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Caroline Kirkland, E.D.E.N. Southworth, and María Ruiz de Burton.  Critical readings may include work by William Cronon, Richard White, Patrick Wolfe, J. Kehaulani Kauanui, Edward Watts, Mark Rifkin, and Kathleen Donegan, among others.

Course Method of Evaluation and Requirements:
Participation (10%); Weekly short writing assignments ( 20%); In-class presentation (10%); Annotated bibliography (15%); Final essay (45%)

Term: S-Term (Spring or Second Term: January - April 2019)
Date/Time: Tuesdays, 10:00 am - 1:00 pm, 3 hours
Location: Room JHB TBA (Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street)

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ENG5052HF
Nineteenth-Century American Literature and Industrial Revolution
A. Ackerman

Course Description:  
“Only as far as [people] are unsettled,” wrote Emerson, “is there any hope for them.” When Herman Melville was born in 1819, the fastest way to travel was by hoof or by sail. Candles lit homes after dark. When he died in 1891, the railroad and steamship had altered time and space; electricity poles connected telegraph and telephone wires and lit buildings throughout New York City. Rapid technological change had become the one constant of the modern world. This course looks back to the nineteenth century, from roughly 1819 to the start of World War I, to investigate American authors’ literary responses to the first waves of rapid technological, social, and economic change. As historian Henry Adams wrote in 1907, “All he could prove was change.” Reading American authors from Washington Irving to Edith Wharton, who make change a central theme, this course will situate literary texts in relation to their material culture and changing modes of production, as well as radical social and political changes, including forms of evolutionary thought associated with Karl Marx and Charles Darwin.

Course Reading List: 
Primary texts: Washington Irving, "Rip Van Winkle," "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" Margaret Fuller, Woman in the Nineteenth Century; Ralph Waldo Emerson, selected essays; Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass; Henry David Thoreau, Walden; Emily Dickinson, selected poems; Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass (1855), Democratic Vistas; Herman Melville, "Bartleby, the Scrivener: A Story of Wall Street;" Mark Twain, A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court; Edith Wharton, The House of Mirth; Henry James, "The Jolly Corner;" Henry Adams, The Education of Henry Adams

Secondary Texts: Marx, selected writings; Darwin, selections from On the Origin of Species; Burke, Attitudes toward History; Horkheimer and Adorno, Dialectic of Enlightenment; Kern, The Culture of Time and Space: 1880-1918; Berry, "The Unsettling of America;" Trachtenberg, The Incorporation of America: Culture and Society in the Gilded Age; Bercovitch, The Rites of Assent: Transformations in the Symbolic Construction of America; Walls, Seeing New Worlds: Henry David Thoreau and Nineteenth-Century Natural Science; Schlereth, Victorian America: Transformations in Everyday Life, 1876-1913; Greene, Horses at Work: Harnessing Power in Industrial America; Cronon, Nature's Metropolis: Chicago and the Great West; Gordon, The Rise and Fall of American Growth; North, Novelty

Course Method of Evaluation and Learning Outcomes:
1. Seminar discussion: Informed participation (20%). 2. 300-word responses on Blackboard (20%). 3. Presentations (20%). 4. Research Essay (40%).

Term: F-Term (Fall or First Term: September - December 2018)
Date/Time: Wednesdays, 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm, 2 hours
Location: Room JHB TBA (Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street)

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ENG5062HF
The Rise of the Transnational American Novel
R. Boyagoda

Course Description: 
This Seminar proposes that major American novels, from Herman Melville's Moby Dick to David Foster Wallace's Infinite Jest, have always depended upon irreducibly transnational features and configurations for the establishment of their stature as signal narratives of nation. In this Seminar novels by Melville, William Faulkner, Junot Diaz, David Foster Wallace, and Annie Proulx will be read in tandem with recent New American Studies scholarship and criticism that constitutes the "transnational turn" in the field, and also in tandem with foundational interventionist works of Transnational American Studies by CLR James, Gloria Anzaldua, and others. The Seminar will look at how treatments of geography, race, economics, ecology and politics in these novels depend upon and enact transnational circulations of people and power, even while still presuming a primacy of national purpose, identity, and resonance. Each novel will also be situated in the cultural-economic context of its original publication, with particular attention paid to early assessments and to how the novel's transnational elements were (and were not) identified and valued.

Course Reading List: 
Primary Texts (in order of reading): Moby Dick, by Herman Melville. Absalom, Absalom!, by William Faulkner Infinite Jest, by David Foster Wallace The Brief, Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, by Junot Diaz Barkskins, by Annie Proulx. Criticism, scholarship and related writings by Gloria Anzaldua, Wai-Chee Dimock. Shelley Fisher Fishkin, Edouard Glissant, Yogita Goyal, CLR James, Jose Marti, Viet Thanh Nguyen, and Donald Pease.

Course Method of Evaluation and Requirements:
Requirements (no. 1): Major Research Paper (25 pp): 70% Paper proposal and annotated bibliography (3-5 pp): 10% Seminar presentation (15 minutes, with written submission (3pp): 10% Participation (throughout term): 10%

Term: F-Term (Fall or First Term: September - December 2018)
Date/Time: Tuesdays, 4:00 pm - 7:00 pm, 3 hours
Location: Room JHB TBA (Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street)

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ENG5075HS
Aesthetics of Struggle: Revolution, Fugitivity, Survival
R. Mehta

Course Description:  
While the idea of political struggle certainly shaped the aesthetic work of/about the dispossessed throughout the twentieth century, it has seen an exciting resurgence in postcolonial and black studies today. Recent publications such as Christina Sharpe’s In the Wake: On Blackness and Being (2016), Sara Ahmed’s Living a Feminist Life (2017), and Leela Gandhi’s The Common Cause (2014) have been received as paradigm-shifting conceptions of struggle from within the anti-colonial archive. Importantly for us, these theoretical texts make aesthetics crucial to the possibility of survival in the face of racial, colonial, and sexual violence, and in that sense, remind us of the “identity-in-difference” of the aesthetics and politics of representation that Gayatri Spivak brought to light in “Can the Subaltern Speak?” This seminar takes its cues from new theories of resistance, looking back to the 1920s up to the present. Together, we will read closely the literature, media, and theory of anti-colonial revolts and transnational solidarity; feminist of color radicalism; and scenes of abandonment, flight, fugitivity, and quiet refusal. Our goal will be to account for aesthetic experience in the staging of damaged life as it seeks to break out of, or survive from within, the repetitive structure of violence.

Course Reading List:  
Primary Texts: W.E.B. Du Bois, Dark Princess: A Romance (1928); Raja Rao, Kanthapura (1938); C.L.R. James, The Black Jacobins (1938); Kamladevi Chattopadhyay, The Awakening of Indian Women (1939); Amrita Pritam, Pinjar (The Skeleton) (1950); Frantz Fanon, Black Skin, White Masks (1952); Mahasweta Devi, Jhansir Rani [The Queen of Jhansi] (1956); Richard Wright, The Color Curtain (1956); Toni Morrison, Sula (1973); Satyajit Ray, Shatranj ke Khilari [The Chessplayers] (1977) (film); Moraga & Anzaldua, This Bridge Called My Back (1981); Ngugi wa Thiong’o, Matigari (1987); Girish Karnad, Tale-Danda [Decapitation] (1990); Haile Gerima, Sankofa (1993) (film); Goran Olsson, The Black Power Mixtape (2011) (film); Vishal Bhardvaj & Basharat Peer, Haidar (2014) (film); Colson Whitehead, The Underground Railroad (2016) Secondary Texts: Antonio Gramsci, Selections from The Prison Notebooks (1971); Ranajit Guha, “The Prose of Counter-Insurgency” (1983); Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, “Can the Subaltern Speak?” (1988); Jenny Livinstone, Paris is Burning (1990); Zeinabu Irene Davis, Compensation (1999); Roderick Ferguson, Aberrations in Black: Toward a Queer of Color Critique (2003), selections; Daphne Brooks, Bodies in Dissent (2006), selections; Lisa Lowe, The Intimacies of Four Continents (2015), selections; Christina Sharpe, In the Wake: On Blackness and Being (2016), selections; Ava duVernay, 13th (2016) (film); Achille Mbembe, Critique of Black Reason (2017), selections.

Course Method of Evaluation and Requirements:
20% Weekly Reading Response; 20% Class Presentation; 15% Abstract and Bibliography of Final Paper; 45% Final Paper (20 pages)

Term: S-Term (Spring or Second Term: January - April 2019)
Date/Time: Mondays, 10:00 am - 12:00 pm, 2 hours
Location: Room JHB TBA (Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street)

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ENG5130HF
Oceanic Modernisms: The Sea and Modernist British Literature
M. Uphaus

Course Description:  
Melting icecaps in the Arctic, refugees risking the crossing of the Mediterranean, hurricanes of unprecedented magnitude boiling out of the Atlantic: in these and other ways, the ocean is returning to the forefront of contemporary concerns. This course asks what we at this juncture can learn from another period intensely focused on the ocean: the modernist era in Britain. During this period, the sea held a uniquely prominent place in British life, as both the basis of Britain’s imperial power and the space in which that power’s limits were most keenly felt. Modernists like Conrad, Woolf, Eliot, and Joyce reflect this maritime centrality in the similar prominence their works accord the ocean. Our course will explore the connections between literary modernism and modernist-era Britain’s sea-oriented culture. How did maritime discourses and practices feed the growth of British modernism? How did modernist works draw on and alter the sea’s complex, shifting, contested significance? And how might modernism’s engagement with the ocean help equip us conceptually for our own oceanic moment? We will address such questions by reading modernist landmarks from Britain and its empire alongside other primary works, as well as secondary scholarship in oceanic studies and the new modernist studies.

Course Reading List:  
Primary Texts (subject to change): Erskine Childers, "The Riddle of the Sands"; Rudyard Kipling, "Captains Courageous" and "The Seven Seas" (selections TBD); Joseph Conrad, The Nigger of the “Narcissus,” “Falk,” “Initiation” (from "The Mirror of the Sea"), “The Unlighted Coast”; Thomas Hardy, “The Convergence of the Twain”; Virginia Woolf, "The Waves" and "To the Lighthouse"; T. S. Eliot, “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock,” "The Waste Land," and "Four Quartets"; Katherine Mansfield, “How Pearl Button was Kidnapped,” “At the Bay,” “The Voyage”; Allen Curnow, selected poems (TBD); J. M. Synge, "Riders to the Sea"; James Joyce, “Eveline” and "Ulysses" (chapters 1-3); Derek Walcott, "The Sea at Dauphin," “The Sea Is History,” “The Schooner Flight”; B. S. Johnson, "Trawl." Secondary and critical material (subject to change): Alfred Thayer Mahan, "The Influence of Sea Power upon History"; Robert Louis Stevenson, “The English Admirals”; Hester Blum, “The Prospect of Oceanic Studies”; Christopher Connery, “Sea Power,” “Ideologies of Land and Sea,” “There Was No More Sea”; Steve Mentz, "At the Bottom of Shakespeare’s Ocean" and "Shipwreck Modernity"; Dawid de Villiers, “Being at Sea: Ontologising the Sea Narrative”; Philip E. Steinberg, “Of Other Seas: Metaphors and Materialities in Maritime Regions”; Margaret Cohen, "The Novel and the Sea" and “Literary Studies on the Terraqueous Globe”; David Bradshaw, “‘The Purest Ecstasy’: Virginia Woolf and the Sea”; Nicole Rizzuto, “Maritime Modernism: The Aqueous Form of Virginia Woolf’s 'The Waves'”; Jed Esty, "A Shrinking Island"; Anna Snaith, "Modernist Voyages"; Paul Gilroy, "The Black Atlantic"; Ian Baucom, "Specters of the Atlantic"; Allan Sekula, "Fish Story"

Course Method of Evaluation and Requirements (no. 1):
Participation, including both in-class discussion and online discussion via discussion board (25%); In-class presentation (25%); Seminar paper, c. 20 pages (50%)

Term: F-Term (Fall or First Term: September - December 2018)
Date/Time: Wednesdays, 3:00 pm - 6:00 pm, 3 hours
Location: Room JHB TBA (Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street)

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ENG5279HS
Class and Community in Postwar American Literature
N. Dolan

Course Description:
Marxist theory posits a binary class structure rooted in an inevitable progressive conflict between bourgeois and proletariat. But more complex, many-layered, indeterminate, and unstable patterns of stratification emerged in American society in the aftermath of WWII. These included a significant amount of upward mobility for white ethnics and women, the slow emergence of a black middle class, and the apparently diminishing importance of class-based communal affiliations and identifications for suburbanite consumers with ready access to advanced technology of communication and transportation. This course looks at a range of postwar American literature with an eye towards what it discloses about social class in this period. It also draws on literary and sociological theory as well as empirical sociological studies to illuminate the literature.

Course Reading List:
Authors to be considered may include: Jack Kerouac, Raymond Carver, Tillie Olson, Rita Dove, Flannery O'Connor, John Cheever, Bernard Malamud, Philip Roth, Joan Didion, John Updike, Richard Rodriquez, Junot Diaz, Vladimir Nabokov, Joyce Carol Oates, Nathaniel West, Andre Dubus, Russell Banks, Jhumpa Lahiri

Course Method of Evaluation and Requirements:
In the first four weeks we will establish a set of shared conceptual reference points by recourse to: (1) Rhonda Levine’s Social Class and Stratification (2006) – a useful selection of major statements on social class from Marx to the present, including Weber, American stratification theorists, Frank Parkin, and Erik Olin Wright; (2) substantial selections from Pierre Bourdieu’s Distinction (1984); and (3) Annette Lareau’s and Dalton Conley’s Social Class: How Does it Work (2008). In all subsequent weeks the discussion will focus on a primary work of literature. Each week one or two students will also make brief ten-to-fifteen-minute presentations on a work of history, literary theory, or practical criticism relevant to the topic of social class (20%). (A secondary bibliography will be provided). At the end of the semester one 20-25 pp. term paper will be required, which must draw upon one work of history, one work of literary theory, one work of sociological theory, and at least one work of previous critical commentary on the specific literary work(s) or author(s) in question (80%).

Term: S-Term (Spring or Second Term: January - April 2019)
Date/Time: Wednesdays, 5:00 pm - 8:00 pm, 3 hours
Location: Room JHB TBA (Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street)

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ENG5300HS
Avant-Garde Aesthetics and Politics in Contemporary Poetry
M. Xie

Course Description:
This seminar focuses on the poetic writings that have appeared in the United States and Britain since the 1950s under various categorizations: for example, avant-garde, linguistically or formally innovative, experimental, L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E, late modernist, neo-modernist, postmodernist, or conceptualist. We will closely examine key works by the following Anglo-American poets from the 1950s to the present: Charles Olson, Robert Creeley, Frank O’Hara, John Ashbery, Lyn Hejinian, Charles Bernstein, John Yau, Lisa Robertson, J. H. Prynne, Keston Sutherland, and Kenneth Goldsmith. We will place their writings in relation to their historical, intellectual and political contexts and explore topics and issues such as the following: aesthetics and politics; theories of the avant-garde and poetic experimentalism; ideological implications of subject matter and poetic forms; tradition and originality; language, the arts and mediality.

Course Reading List:
Readings to be accessed online.

Course Requirements and Method of Evaluation:
Informed participation 20%, 15-minute presentation 20% (3-page written version due in class on the day of presentation), 5-page annotated bibliography 15%, 15-page final research paper 45%

Term: S-Term (Spring or Second Term: January - April 2019)
Date/Time: Fridays, 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm, 2 hours
Location: Room JHB TBA (Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street)

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ENG5540HS
Modernism and Its Media: Fiction and Theatre in the Age of Film and Radio
L. Switzky

Course Description:
Modernism might be defined by radical formal experimentation in the arts as much as by uncanny new perceptual experiences in everyday life: the severing of voice and body on telephone wires, the crackle of phonograph recordings that made dead voices speak again, the "annihilation of time and space" on highspeed railway journeys. This course offers a reading of major works of literary and theatrical modernism through the crises--and euphoria--surrounding the emergence of new optical and sonic media (primarily film and radio), and the wild array of strategies that artists in established media (fiction and drama) developed to resist, incorporate, and critique the screens, transmitters, and inscription devices of mass culture. While we will focus primarily on questions of mediation and immediacy, other topics will include: theories of absorption and estrangement; machine logic vs. human desire; the purity or impurity of media boundaries; liveness and presence; the modernist crowd; points of contact between primitivist ritual and mechanized man; democratic and anti-democratic attitudes in the arts.

Course Reading List:
The course will comprise three groups of readings. We will examine nineteenth-century treatises on the mediation of perception (Goethe, Helmholtz, Baudelaire, Ruskin, Tolstoy, Wagner) as well as theoretical accounts of how new technological developments formed the modernist sensorium (Benjamin, Kracauer, Arnheim, Williams, Kenner, Kittler, Crary, Gunning, Bolter and Grusin, Gitelman, Wollaeger, Deleuze). Most of our time, however, will be dedicated to case studies of modernist novelists and playwrights: Oscar Wilde, W. B. Yeats, Virginia Woolf, D. H. Lawrence, T. S. Eliot, Anita Loos, Bernard Shaw, James Joyce, Gertrude Stein, Jean Cocteau, Bertolt Brecht and Samuel Beckett.

Course Method of Evaluation and Requirements:
1st paper - 30%; 2nd paper - 30%; participation - 10%; presentation (including 3 response papers) - 30%.

Term: S-Term (Spring or Second Term: January - April 2019)
Date/Time: Thursdays, 12:00 pm - 2:00 pm, 2 hours
Location: Room JHB TBA (Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street)

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ENG5799HF
Settler-Colonialism and American Indian Writing
C. Suzack

Course Description:  
Settler colonialism’s monumental reach toward paradigm preeminence in striving to account for all facets of Indigenous dispossession in the Americas risks entrenching metaphors that obscure the micro-politics of resistance through which tribal peoples withstood colonization. In Patrick Wolfe’s important formulation of the relationship between territorial dispossession and land, “Property starts where Indianness stops” (Traces of History). Wolfe’s metaphor asserts an over-arching logic that codes tribal peoples “Indigenousness” as necessarily tied to their homelands, an identity that they relinquish when they move or are removed to new territories. Yet, Indigenous peoples’ relationships to land and their capacity for mobility are both implicated in and exceeded by the inertia of property rights. As they settled new territories during the removal period, they formed ties to lands and other tribal communities that altered the logics of their containment through land dispossession. In this course, we will explore literary and historical texts describing this paradox. We will focus on 19th and 20th century American Indian writing that emphasizes tribal peoples’ practices of mobility while also analyzing their “unfree” status in order to explore the micro-logics of resistance through which tribal identity endured.

Course Reading List:  
Ned Blackhawk, Violence over the Land
Steven J. Crum, The Road On Which We Came
Louise Erdrich, Tracks
Linda Hogan, People of the Whale
Sarah Winnemucca Hopkins, Life Among the Piutes
Stephen Graham Jones, Bleed Into Me: A Book of Stories
Lisa Lowe, The Intimacies of Four Continents
N. Scott Momaday, House Made of Dawn
Robert Williams, The American Indian in Western Legal Thought (selections)
Patrick Wolfe, Traces of History: Elementary Structures of Race (selections)

Course Method of Evaluation and Requirements:
Participation 20%; Position papers 25%; Research essay prospectus 10%; Research Essay 45%

Term: F-Term (Fall or First Term: September - December 2018)
Date/Time: Mondays, 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm, 2 hours
Location: Room JHB TBA (Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street)

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ENG5901HF
New World African Literature
G.E. Clarke

Course Description:
This course will read contemporary writers and texts of African/Black/Negro heritage from around the Americas—and across genres—in English or in English translation.  We will compare and contrast the ways in which these authors engage with imperatives of history and issues of identity.  Exemplary authors include Baldwin, Brand, A. Clarke, Fanon, Laferrière , Morrison, Philip, and Walcott, etc.  We will also screen pertinent films.

Course Reading List:
We may read selections from Austin Clarke, M. NourbeSe Philip, D. Laferriere, D. Walcott, E.K. Braithwaite, F. Fanon, B. Obama, T. Morrison.

Method of Evaluation and Course Requirements:
Seminar presentation: 30%
Research paper: 50%
Participation: 20%

Term: F-Term (Fall or First Term: September - December 2018)
Date/Time: Tuesdays, 9:00 am - 11:00 am, 2 hours
Location: Room JHB TBA (Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street)

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ENG5988HF
Posthuman Encounters in Contemporary Canadian Literature 
T. Aguila-Way

Course Description:  
This course will consider contemporary Canadian works of fiction and poetry that stage messy entanglements between the human, animal, and machine worlds. We will read these literary texts alongside theoretical works from the interrelated fields of posthumanist, new materialist, and affect theory. Our goal in pairing these literary and theoretical works will be threefold. First, we will explore how contemporary Canadian writers have used the boundary between the human and the non-human as a site from which to destabilize liberal humanist conceptions of selfhood and imagine more ethical ways of relating to non-human others and the environment. Second, we will consider how efforts to imagine a posthumanist ontology can occasion new ways of thinking about the ontology of literary production, giving rise to novel experiments in narrative and poetic form. Third, we will consider how the posthumanist encounters portrayed in some of our texts disrupt the intellectual and material legacies of settler colonialism, thus contributing to ongoing debates around decolonization and Indigenous-settler relations in Canada.

Course Reading List:  
Literary Texts: Larissa Lai, Salt Fish Girl; Hiromi Goto, Hopeful Monsters; Margaret Atwood, Oryx and Crake; Wayde Compton, The Outer Harbour; Douglas Coupland, Generation A; Adam Dickinson, Kingdom, Phylum; Larissa Lai & Rita Wong, Sybil Unrest; Rachel Zolf, Janey’s Arcadia. Theory: Rosi Braidotti, The Posthuman; Stacy Alaimo, Bodily Natures: Science, Environment, and the Material Self; Mel Y. Chen, Animacies: Biopolitics, Racial Mattering, and Queer Affect; Elizabeth Grozs, Becoming Undone: Darwinian Reflections on Life; N. Katherine Hayles, My Mother Was a Computer: Digital Subjects and Literary Texts.

Course Methods of Evaluation and Requirements:
TBA

Term: F-Term (Fall or First Term: September - December 2018)
Date/Time: Thursdays, 10:00 am - 1:00 pm, 3 hours
Location: Room JHB TBA (Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street)

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