Department of English

University of Toronto

2018 Summer Courses

2018 Summer Graduate Course Timetable TBA

& Course Descriptions TBA*


NB: ROSI/Acorn Enrolment for Graduate English Summer Courses opening TBA

Scroll down to Course Descriptions.  Please note specific dates below. (*NOTE: Room locations, Timetable & course information TBA.)

Time

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

11am–1pm

 

 

1pm–2pm

2pm–4pm

 

 

4pm–6pm

6pm-8pm

 

 

6pm-9pm

 

 

 

 

 

2018 Summer Graduate Course Descriptions


ENG2019HF 
Early Modern Psyches: Shakespeare and Psychoanalysis
E. Harvey

Course Description:
Freud’s frequent, often pivotal references to Shakespeare signal both deep cultural influence and a complex intertwining of shared attention to the nature and structure of the human psyche. The dominance of historicist approaches to early modern studies over the past three decades has tended to marginalize psychoanalysis as a discourse; this seminar will explore the resources of psychoanalytic theory for understanding the early modern “emergence” of subjectivity. We will consider historicism’s skepticism about and exclusion of psychoanalysis, what was at stake in these debates, the role of historical phenomenology and cognitive approaches, and the current reemergence of psychoanalytic theory. Four Shakespearean texts (The Rape of Lucrece, The Winter’s Tale, Cymbeline, and The Tempest) will serve as case studies for our exploration of such topics as the operations of the mind, the imagination, boundaries between the human subject and their animal counterparts or between human subjects and the landscape, the passions, dream-work, consciousness, gender, and sexuality. Readings will include papers by Freud (on animism, dreams, the unconscious, the uncanny), Laplanche (fantasy and sexuality), and Kristeva (language, the semiotic, the abject), and recent scholarship by such critics as Lynn Enterline, Mary Thomas Crane, David Hillman, Bruce Smith, and Cynthia Marshall.

Course Reading List:
Shakespeare, The Rape of Lucrece, The Winter's Tale, Cymbeline, The Tempest; Freud, Laplanche, Kristeva, Agamben (selected works) Essays: Lynn Enterline, David Hillman, Mary Thomas Crane, Bruce Smith, Cynthia Marshall

Course Method of Evaluation and Requirements:
Participation 10%, Oral Presentation 20%, Research Proposal 20%, Essay 50%

Term: Summer F-Term 
Date/Time: TBA
Location: Room TBA (Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street)


ENG5005HF
Modern Poetry and Philosophy: Dialogues of Poetic and Philosophical Thinking 

M. Xie

Course Description:
This seminar explores the connections, interactions and contestations between poetry and philosophy in modern Anglo-American poetic practice and philosophical thought since the Romantics. Modern lyric poetry is a site of fertile interaction between poetic production and philosophical inquiry. How have poets such as Wordsworth, Eliot and Stevens engaged philosophical thinking? How have philosophers such as Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty engaged poets and the poetic? How are poetry and philosophy opposed to each other and yet united in their similar but different modes of discursive practice? Such questions constitute the focus of this seminar. Issues and topics to be explored include: dialogue and resonance between poetic and philosophical thinking; abstract thought, phenomenology and lived experience; poetry, philosophy, ethics; the beautiful and the sublime; poetry and philosophy as ways of knowing and as modes of discovering and constructing meaning; language, imagination, and the resistance of the real; poetry as another kind of philosophizing; poetry and the production of thought; the importance of literary form to poetic and philosophical thinking.

Course
Reading List:
Selected works from William Wordsworth, Emily Dickinson, T. S. Eliot, Wallace Stevens, Samuel Beckett, and J. H. Prynne; selections from Immanuel Kant, Soren Kierkegaard, Henri Bergson, Martin Heidegger, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Theodor Adorno, and Luce Irigaray.

Course
Requirements and Method of Evaluation:
Presentation (20%); informed participation (20%); annotated research bibliography (15%); final research paper (45%).

Term: Summer F-Term 
Date/Time: TBA

Location: TBA

Top of Page
Return to Graduate Courses homepage.


ENG5524HF 
Modernism, Modernity and the Crisis in Temporality

G. Leonard

Course Description:
My presentation of modernist writers from 1895 to 1937 will explore how Wilde, Conrad, Joyce, Woolf, Eliot, Stevens, Yeats and Rhys register the crisis brought on—both in psychological models of subjectivity and aesthetic models of representation—by the progressive disenchantment of the modern world (to use Weber’s phrase). Even as the mysteries of Religion yield to the calculations of Science, the lived experience of “time” becomes more and more strange. Joyce will design the “epiphany”; Woolf will devote enormous attention to “the moment”; Rhys will document the way the unbearable burden of “time,” separated from “meaning” drives the addictive behaviours so prevalent in modernity. Without eternal verities intersecting causal sequence, time becomes a burden. Woolf will also look for secular equivalencies of formerly transcendent potentialities: the bond between Septimus and Mrs. Dalloway, for example, flourishing in the most unlikely manner, despite Sir William Bradshaw’s corrosive scientific method of “conversion” and “proportion,” reducing “human nature” to just another kind of “rough beast.”. Eliot’s Tiresias, adrift in modern London, is a helpless witness, watching people burrow deeper and deeper into an imminent secularity that forever promises a satisfaction that never arrives. Finally, Jean Rhys’s remarkable 1937 novel Good Morning, Midnight seems to herald the arrival of Yeats’s “rough beast” in the form of a rapidly spreading fascism, one that brings on the midnight of World War II.

Course Reading List: 
Readings:

Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray; Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness; James Joyce, selections from Dubliners; Virgina Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway; T.S. Eliot, The Waste Land; Jean Rhys, Good Morning, Midnight.
Critical Works (from which Selections will be drawn):
Charles Taylor: Sources of the Self: The Making of the Modern Identity, A Secular Age; Couze Venn: Occidentalism: Modernity and Subjectivity (2000); Walter Mignolo: The Darker Side of Western Modernity: Global Futures, Decolonial Options. (2011); Fredric Jameson: A Singular Modernity: Essay on the Ontology of the Present (2002); Anthony Giddens: Modernity and Self-Identity (1991); Edward Said: Culture and Imperialism; Michael Gillespie: The Theological Origins of Modernity (2009); Marshall Berman: All That is Solid Melts into Air: The Experience of Modernity (1992); Maureen Perkins: The Reform of Time: Magic and Modernity (2001)
Essay Collections:
NowHere: Space, Time and Modernity (1994), ed. Roger Friedland; Myth and the Making of Modernity: The Problem of Grounding in Early Twentieth Century Literature (1998), eds. Michael Bell, Peter Poellner; Religions of Modernity: Relocating the Sacred to the Self and the Digital (2010), eds. Stef Aupers and Dick Houtman.

Course Requirements and Method of Evaluation:
10 percent weekly response; 20 percent presentation; 70 percent final essay.

Term: Summer F-Term 
Date/Time: TBA

Location: TBA

Top of Page

Return to Graduate Courses homepage.


ENG5580HF
American Pastoral: Agriculture and Environment in American Literature
A. Most


Course Description:
American Pastoral will explore how American writers have imagined and represented the human relationship to non-human nature over the course of more than two centuries. We will read canonical works of American environmental literature as well as key works of eco-criticism in light of twenty-first century environmental realities, analyzing the relationship between narrative and environment in order to build a compelling set of literary approaches equal to the urgent challenges of our contemporary moment.

Course Reading List:

(Some titles still subject to change)
Primary Texts: Bill McKibben, Eaarth; Henry D. Thoreau, Walden, Civil Disobedience and Other Writings; Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass; Willa Cather, My Antonia; Rachel Carson, Silent Spring; Wendell Berry, The Art of the Commonplace; Leslie Marmon Silko, Ceremony; Toni Morrison, Beloved; Philip Roth, The Counterlife; Cormac McCarthy, The Road; Michael Pollan, The Omnivore’s Dilemma; Dave Eggers, Zeitoun; plus selected poems and short essays.
Secondary Texts: Selections from the work of Raymond Williams, Leo Marx, Lawrence Buell, William Cronon, Greg Garrard, Annette Kolodny, Jonathan Bate, Paul Outka, Stacey Alaimo, Ursula Heise, Timothy Morton, Rebecca Solnit and Elizabeth Kolbert.

Course Requirements and Method of Evaluation:

Class Participation 20%, Book Report 15%, Presentation 25%, Final Essay 40%.

Term: Summer F-Term 
Date/Time: TBA

Location: TBA

Top of Page

Return to Graduate Courses homepage.


Return to Graduate Courses homepage.



Site Information:

Site Tools:

Click below for directions to the University of Toronto!

University of Toronto, St. George Campus
Map of St. George Campus
UTM
Map of Mississauga Campus
UTSC
Map of Scarborough Campus