Department of English

University of Toronto

2019 Summer Courses

 

2019 Summer Graduate Course Timetable 

& Course Descriptions


NB: Department ROSI/Acorn Enrolment begins for Summer F/S/Y courses on April 1, 2019 at 6:00 a.m. 

PLEASE NOTE ROOM CHANGES IN "RED" DUE TO SUMMER CONSTRUCTION.

Scroll down or click on Course code to go to Course Descriptions.  Please note specific dates below.

Time

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
10am–12noon   2 hours

ENG2054HF

John Donne:
Theory and Context
E. Harvey
Rm: JHB 718
2 hrs

May 6, 13, 27 and June 3, 10, 17

ENG5046HF
Settler Colonialism and U.S. Literary Studies
M. Gniadek
Rm: JHB 718
2 hrs

May 8, 15, 22, 29; June 5

ENG5046HF
Settler Colonialism and U.S. Literary Studies
M. Gniadek
Rm: JHB718

2 hrs

May 24, 31

12noon -2pm 2 hours

ENG5046HF
Settler Colonialism and U.S. Literary Studies
M. Gniadek
Rm: JHB 718
2 hrs

May 6, 13, 27; June 3, 10
      
1pm–3pm 2 hours  ENG5580HF* American Pastoral: Agriculture and Environment in American Literature(partially taught on location at Bela Farm)

A. Most & C. Holland

Rm: JHB 617 and Bela Farm

 

Dates & locations:

On Campus: Tuesday, May 7 & June 11 (1-3 pm)

*Bela Farm: Arrival Sunday, June 2. Departure Friday, June 7.

ENG2054HF

John Donne:
Theory and Context
E. Harvey
Rm: JHB 718
2 hrs

May 8, 15, 22, 29 and June 5, 12

 ENG5580HF* American Pastoral: Agriculture and Environment in American Literature(partially taught on location at Bela Farm)

A. Most & C. Holland

Rm: JHB 617 and Bela Farm

 

Dates & locations: On Campus: Thursday, May 9** (1-4 pm) & Thursday June 13 (1-3 pm),

*Bela Farm: Arrival Sunday, June 2. Departure Friday, June 7.

**NB: 3 hour class on May 9. 

2pm - 4:30 pm

2.5  hours

ENG2470HF

Milton, Globalism, and the Post-national

P. Stevens
Rm JHB 614
2.5 hours

May 7, 14, 21, 28 and June 4, 11, 18

 

ENG2470HF

Milton, Globalism, and the Post-national

P. Stevens
Rm JHB 614
2 .5 hours

May 17, 24, 31 and June 7, 14

6pm-9pm 3 hours

 

2019 Summer Graduate Course Descriptions

ENG2054HF
John Donne: Theory and Context
E. Harvey

Course Description:
This course will examine John Donne's poetry (Songs and Sonets, Elegies, Satires, verse letters, Anniversaries, Metempsychosis, Divine Poems) and some of his prose (selections from Ignatius his Conclave, Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions, and sermons) in relation to recent developments in literary theory, especially historical phenomenology, deconstruction, psychoanalysis, and feminism. We will consider Donne's cultural and historical context (the structure of professions, court and city, the Inns of Court, religion, emergent science), his relationships to patrons, particularly as they are addressed in his verse letters, the epithalamia, and in the Anniversaries, his constructions of and responses to gender, and his changing poetic and linguistic style (intertextuality, poetic form, poetic career). The course's concentration on subjectivity will allow us to investigate the imbrication of the seventeenth-century discourses of science, medicine, and the relationship between the body and the soul. In addition to reading Donne's poetry and prose, we will include some theoretical and critical texts and pay significant attention to the history of Donne's critical reception.

Course Reading List:
The Complete Poetry and Selected Prose of John Donne, Ed. Charles M. Coffin, Modern Library, 2001.

Method of Evaluation and Course Requirements:
One short (20-minute) oral presentation (25%), active participation in class discussion (10%), prospectus for research essay and bibliography (15%), and one research essay (15-20 pages) (50%).

Term: Summer F-Term (May-June 2019) Mondays: May 6,  13,  27 and June 3,  10 , 17; Wednesdays: May 8,  15,  22,  29 and June 5,  12, 2019
Date/Time: Monday 10-12pm & Wednesday 1-3pm, 2 hours
Location: ROOM CHANGE - JHB 718 (Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street)

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ENG2470HF
Milton, Globalism, and the Post-national
P. Stevens

Course Description:
The early 21st-century is distinguished by the degree to which the nation-state which emerged so powerfully in the early modern period has come to be perceived as undesirable, obsolete, or anachronistic. "Modernity," says the economist Paul Collier, increasingly "strings identity between one pillar of individualism and one of globalism: many young people see themselves as both fiercely individual outsiders in their surrounding society, and as citizens of the world." For many educated elites and young people, the imagined community is not, then, the nation but the "world," a discursive polity imagined not through print so much as electronic media, television and the internet. This course seeks to reappraise the work of Milton and other 17th-century architects of the nation-state in the light of this dramatic new context: in particular, it seeks to understand the degree to which a new universal or global community is already taking shape in contemporary religious and political thought as it is somewhat ironically preoccupied with the nation. The focus of the course is Milton but other writers to be studied include Virgil, St Paul, Shakespeare, Raleigh, and Harrington.

Course Reading List: (subject to revision)
Texts: Required: Milton, John Milton: The Major Works (Oxford); Virgil, Aeneid (Penguin); St Paul, Epistles (AV Bible); Shakespeare, Merchant of Venice (Oxford); Raleigh, History of the World (Oxford); Harrington, Oceana (Cambridge); Course Reader
Recommended: Paul Collier, Exodus: Immigration and Multiculturalism in the 21st Century (Penguin); Alain Badiou, St Paul: The Foundation of Universalism (Stanford); Stevens & Loewenstein, Early Modern Nationalism and Milton's England (Toronto).

Course Method of Evaluation and Requirements:
Class participation, 10%; seminar presentation, 35%; research essay (5,000 words), 55%.

Term: F-Term (May - June 2019)
Date/Time: Tuesday 2-4:30 pm & Friday 2-4:30 pm, (2.5 hours) Tuesdays: May 7,  14,  21,  28 and June 4,  11, 18; Fridays: May 17,  24,  31 and June 7  14, 2019 NOTE CHANGE IN COURSE HOURS AND DAYS

Location: Room CHANGE JHB 614 (Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street)

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ENG5046HF
Settler Colonialism and U.S. Literary Studies
M. Gniadek

Course Description:
The term “settler colonialism” has been used to conceptualize the histories of nations like Canada, Australia, and New Zealand for decades.  But recently the term has also been widely used in U.S. contexts.  In this course we will trace the recent emergence of the settler colonial paradigm in U.S. academic discourse, and we’ll consider whether and how it is actually a departure from earlier work.  Our focus will be on literature from the colonial period through the nineteenth century (requiring us to re-think the phrase “U.S. Literary Studies” in our course title) and we will read these texts in conversation with a range of scholarly engagements with imperialism, empire, and settler colonialism.  What kinds of thinking and reading does the idea of settler colonialism allow for American/U.S. literatures that other ways of engaging histories and texts might not?  What are its limitations?

Course Reading List:
Primary texts considered may include works by William Bradford, Roger Williams, Charles Brockden Brown, William Apess, Black Hawk, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Caroline Kirkland, E.D.E.N. Southworth, and María Ruiz de Burton.  Critical readings may include work by William Cronon, Richard White, Patrick Wolfe, J. Kehaulani Kauanui, Edward Watts, Mark Rifkin, and Kathleen Donegan, among others.

Course Method of Evaluation and Requirements:
Participation (10%); Weekly short writing assignments ( 20%); In-class presentation (15%); Annotated bibliography (15%); Final essay (40%)

Term: Summer F-Term (May - June, 2019. *See detailed specific dates below)
Date/Time - MONDAY, WEDNESDAY & SOME FRIDAYS:
 * Mondays: May 6,  13,  27 and June 3, 10 from 12pm to 2pm; Wednesdays: May 8,  15,  22,  29 and June 5 from 10am to 12 pm.; Fridays: May 24,  31 from 10am to 12pm.
Location: ROOM CHANGE - JHB 718 (Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street)

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ENG5580HF
American Pastoral: Agriculture and Environment in American Literature
(partially taught on location at Bela Farm); Dates/Times specified below*
A. Most and C.Holland

Course Description:
American Pastoral will explore how American writers have imagined and represented the human relationship to non-human nature over the course of more than two centuries. We will read canonical works of American environmental literature as well as key works of eco-criticism in light of twenty-first century environmental realities, analyzing the relationship between narrative and environment in order to build a compelling set of literary approaches equal to the urgent challenges of our contemporary moment.

The classical pastoral mode, as illustrated in Shakespeare comedies such as As You Like It, involves the movement of urban characters from the city to a rural retreat. In the bosom of nature, they are transformed and return to the city revitalized.

*Course Schedule:

AT ST. GEORGE CAMPUS
Tuesday May 7: Session 1, 1-3 pm
Thursday, May 9: Session 2, 1-4* pm  N.B.: *THREE HOUR CLASS ON MAY 9
Weeks of May 13, 20, and 27: Students complete reading and prepare presentations.

AT BELA FARM** (5 nights, 6 days)
Sunday, June 2: Afternoon arrival at Bela Farm. Introductory walk and camp setup.
Monday June 3: Sessions 3 & 4 (morning and afternoon)
Tuesday, June 4: Sessions 5 & 6 (morning and afternoon)
Wednesday June 5: Sessions 7 & 8 (morning and afternoon)
Thursday June 6: Session 9 (morning); Farm-based workshops (afternoon)
Friday June 7: Session 10 (morning); afternoon pack up and departure

AT ST. GEORGE CAMPUS
Tuesday, June 11: Session 11, 1-3 pm
Thursday, June 13: Session 12, 1-3 pm

*Bela Farm is a beautiful 100-acre centre for creative responses to global environmental crisis located about an hour northwest of Toronto in Hillsburgh, ON. The farm has toilet and shower facilities, an indoor / outdoor kitchen (with fridge and running water) designed for immersive educational retreats, and a variety of indoor/outdoor classroom spaces.

Course Reading List:
Primary Texts: Genesis (King James Bible); Shakespeare, As You Like It; Thomas Jefferson, Notes on the State of Virginia (selections), Frederick Jackson Turner, "The Significance of the Frontier in American History;" Robin Wall Kimmerer, Braiding Sweetgrass; Henry D. Thoreau, selections from Walden and "Walking"; Willa Cather, My Antonia; Rachel Carson, Silent Spring; Wendell Berry, Essays from The Art of the Commonplace and selected poetry; Toni Morrison, Beloved; Barry Lopez, The Rediscovery of North America, Michael Pollan, The Omnivore's Dilemma; plus additional selected poems and short essays.
Secondary Texts: Selections from the work of Raymond Williams, William Cronon, Carolyn Merchant, Annette Kolodny, Christopher Manes, Stacey Alaimo, Ursula Heise and others to be determined.

Course Requirements and Method of Evaluation:
Class Participation 20%, Book Report 15%, Presentation 25%, Final Essay 40%.

Accessibility: Activities at Bela Farm involve walking to various sites, sitting on the ground, interacting with nature using auditory and visual senses, camping overnight in a tent, and planting or other light manual labour such as a beekeeping workshop. Bela Farm is not wheelchair accessible. However, extra time or transportation from site to site by car is available for students who require it. Students with accessibility needs beyond these provisions are encouraged to contact the course instructors to discuss how best their needs can be met.

Term: Summer F-Term (May - June, 2019. See above for detailed schedule and location information)
Dates/Times:   
 - On Campus: Tuesday, May 7 (1-3 pm), Thursday, May 9 (1-4 pm)
 - Bela Farm: Arrival Sunday, June 2. Departure Friday, June 7 (June 2 to 7, inclusive)   
 - On Campus: Tuesday, June 11 (1-3 pm), Thursday, June 13 (1-3 pm)  

Locations: On Campus: ROOM CHANGE-Tuesdays & Thursdays: JHB 617 (Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street); and at Bela Farm.

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