Department of English

University of Toronto

4000 Series Course Descriptions

ENG4211HF
Romanticism and Translation
A. Bewell

Course Description:
This course seeks to introduce students to the theory and history of translation while examining the centrality of translation in its many dimensions in British Romantic literature. Although some attention will be given to literary translation narrowly defined, the primary focus of the course will be on seeing translation as a vital creative, cultural, political, economic, and interpretive activity in the age of empire.

Course Reading List:
William Jones, Chatterton, Burns, Wordsworth, Coleridge, P.B. Shelley, Felicia Hemans, and other writers of the Romantic period. Theorists will include Brian Friel, Friedrich Schleiermacher, and Walter Benjamin.

Course Method of Evaluation and Course Requirements:
Research essay 30%; Research Project Proposal 15%; Review 25%; In-Class Presentation 20%; participation 10%. 

Term: F-TERM (September 2020 to December 2020)
Date/Time: 9:00 am to 12:00 pm, Fridays
Location:
 ONLINE DELIVERY (SYNCHRONOUS), via teleconferencing.  Link to be sent to students directly by the instructor. 

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ENG4662HS
Romantic Memory
K. Weisman

Course Description:
We are currently in the midst of a resurgence of memory studies, a field that crosses many disciplines and methodological approaches. Memory has always been one of the central motifs of Romanticism, and it has recently become a subject newly engaged by Romantic theorists. The historical and conceptual study of memory affords opportunity to interrogate the aesthetic, political, cultural, and sociological implications of Romantic discourse. We will examine poetry and prose that engage with questions of subjectivity and the self; the pathologies of nostalgia; nationalism and the past; and the tensions between history and memory. The perils of memory within all of these foci include sentimentalism, political xenophobia, and solipsism; its triumphs include cultural cohesion and self-identification. We will address Romantic memory in its full complexity.

Course Reading List:
Reading will be drawn from such texts as the following: John Locke, An Essay Concerning Human Understanding; David Hume, A Treatise of Human Nature; William Wordsworth, The Prelude and Lyrical Ballads; Jane Austen, Mansfield Park or Persuasion; Thomas De Quincey, Confessions of an English Opium Eater and Suspiria de Profundis; Felicia Hemans, Records of Woman and Other Poems; William Godwin, Caleb Williams.

Course Method of Evaluating and Course Requirements:
Assignments and Grading Scheme: class participation 10%; book report 15%; seminar and write-up 30%; course paper 45%.

Term: S-TERM (January 2021 to April 2021)
Date/Time: 1:00 pm to 3:00 pm, Mondays
Location: ONLINE DELIVERY
(SYNCHRONOUS), via teleconferencing.  Link to be sent to students directly by the instructor.

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ENG4770HS
Aesthetics and Ethics: The Late Victorians
H. Li

Course Description
This is a critical survey course examining the late Victorians’ intellectual efforts to move beyond mid-Victorian culture. In particular, we will focus on their conception of the relations between aesthetics and ethics, as a paradigm shift away from mid-Victorian ideas of ethics, which were primarily rational and prescriptive. By analyzing experimental ideas of cognitive aesthetics in George Eliot, William Morris, Robert Browning, Thomas Hardy, Walter Pater and Oscar Wilde, we will reconstruct a contestatory conception of ethics in these writers that was ironic, sensory and counter-factual, a new “higher ethics” (Walter Pater). Issues to be discussed will include ethology of skepticism, dialectics of futuristic envisioning, utopian superscription, naturalistic affect, and sensuality of the intellect. Reduced reading load for 2020-2021.

Course Reading List
Walter Pater, The Renaissance (1873 and 1893); George Eliot, Daniel Deronda (1876); William Morris, News from Nowhere (1890); Oscar Wilde, Picture of Dorian Gray (1890), De Profundis (1905); Thomas Hardy, Jude the Obscure (1895)
There will also be a list of secondary critical works on the late Victorians and theoretical works on the relations between aesthetics and ethics. 

Course Method of Evaluation and Course Requirements
One Seminar Presentation (10 - 15 minutes): 25%; One Major Essay (3,500 - 4,000 words):  55%; informed class participation (including Quercus responses and mini-conference participation): 20%. 

Term: S-TERM (January 2021 to April 2021)
Date/Time: 11:00 am to 1:00 pm, Fridays
Location: ONLINE DELIVERY
(SYNCHRONOUS), via teleconferencing.  Link to be sent to students directly by the instructor.

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ENG4884HF
Everyday Life and 19th-Century Novelistic Representation
A. Jaffe

Course Description:
This course will take up Henri Lefebvre’s contention that everyday life emerged as a new concept for criticism and reflection in the nineteenth century, and will explore the relation between the nineteenth-century novel and everyday life from several different angles. We will discuss the relation between representation and critique; between the individual everyday and that of the group or collective, and between aesthetic and realist representation, along with such topics as temporality, seriality, rituals and routines; boredom, habit, and desire in novelistic representation and modern theory.

Reading List:
Readings by (provisionally) Austen, Eliot, Trollope, Mayhew; theoretical work by Freud, Lefebvre, DeCerteau, Bourdieu, Moretti and others.

Course Method of Evaluation and Course Requirements:
Participation and seminar presentation, 20% each; research paper, 60%.

Term: F-TERM (September 2020 to December 2020)
Date/Time: 1:00 pm to 3:00 pm, Tuesdays
Location: ONLINE DELIVERY
(SYNCHRONOUS) CHANGE

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