Department of English

University of Toronto

2000 Series Course Descriptions

ENG2019HF
Early Modern Psyches: Shakespeare and Psychoanalysis 
E. Harvey

Course Description:
Freud's frequent, often pivotal, references to Shakespeare signal both deep cultural influence and a complex intertwining of shared attention to the nature and structure of the human psyche. The dominance of historicist approaches to early modern studies over the past three decades has tended to marginalize psychoanalysis as a discourse; this seminar will explore the resources of psychoanalytic theory for understanding the early modern "emergence" of subjectivity. We will consider historicism's skepticism about and exclusion of psychoanalysis, what was at stake in these debates, the role of historical phenomenology and cognitive approaches, and the current reemergence of psychoanalytic theory. Five Shakespearean texts (The Rape of Lucrece, Measure for Measure, The Winter's Tale, Cymbeline, and The Tempest) will serve as case studies for our exploration of such topics as the operations of the mind, the imagination, boundaries between the human subject and their animal counterparts or between human subjects and the landscape, the passions, dream-work, consciousness, gender, and sexuality. Readings will include papers by Freud (on animism, dreams, the unconscious, the uncanny), Laplanche (fantasy and sexuality), and Kristeva (language, the semiotic, the abject), and recent scholarship by such critics as Lynn Enterline, Mary Thomas Crane, David Hillman, and Bruce Smith.

Course Reading List:
Shakespeare, The Rape of Lucrece, Measure for Measure, The Winter's Tale, Cymbeline, The Tempest; Freud, Laplanche, Kristeva, Agamben (selected works) Essays: Lynn Enterline, David Hillman, Mary Thomas Crane, Bruce Smith, Cynthia Marshall.

Course Method of Evaluation and Requirements:
Participation 15%, Oral Presentation 25%, Research Proposal 20%, Essay 40%.

Term: F-TERM (September 2021 to December 2021)
Date/Time: 1:00 pm to 3:00 pm, Thursdays
Location: ROOM CANCELLED

Delivery: IN-PERSON * First week of classes in September 2021 taught online.

 

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ENG2022HF
Early Modern Critical Race Studies
U. Chakravarty  

Course Description:
This course has three main aims: firstly, to explore and analyse a range of early modern texts, from plays and poems to travel narratives and maps, which trace the landscape of early modern racial ideologies, frameworks and constructions; secondly, to read, engage and think with key works in the field of critical race studies; and finally, to map the history and terrain of early modern critical race studies and think about its future directions. Students will analyse and engage with the multiple registers of premodern race and its implications for discussions of nation, empire and slavery; religion, class and conduct; capitalism and economy; gender and sexuality; family, blood and kinship; complexion, embodiment and the somatic. We shall also think about questions of reception, representation and appropriation, placing early modern race in conversation with contemporary contexts.

Course Reading List:
Primary texts may include: Behn, Oroonoko; Marlowe, The Jew of Malta; Shakespeare, Othello; Spenser, A View of the Present State of Ireland and/or The Faerie Queene; Milton, Paradise Lost. Theoretical and critical readings may include work by Patricia Akhimie, Kimberlé Crenshaw, Kim F. Hall, Margo Hendricks, Geraldine Heng, Jennifer Morgan, Hortense Spillers, Ayanna Thompson and Sylvia Wynter, among others. (Subject to change.)

Course Method of Evaluation and Course Requirements:
Active and engaged participation: 15% Online discussion posts: 15% Seminar facilitation: 10% Prospectus and annotated bibliography for final paper: 10% Conference paper: 10% Research paper: 40%  

Term: F-TERM (September 2021 to December 2021)
Date/Time: 4:00 pm to 7:00 pm, Tuesdays
Location: RM OI 11200 (Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, 252 Bloor St W, Toronto, ON M5S 1V6)
Delivery: ONLINE DELIVERY (SYNCHRONOUS) (CHANGED)

 

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ENG2464HS
Early Modern Literature and the Crisis of Representation
J. Rogers

Course Description:
A study of the poetry and prose of early modern England in light of the fractious new theories of linguistic and political representation that occasioned them. With attention to the forces behind the generation in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries of new literary genres and modes, the course will examine the emergence of some of literature's most striking forms: the treatise of political and religious obligation, the utopian fantasy, the Biblical tragedy, the devotional poem, the speculative essay, and the "realist" allegorical quest narrative. Authors studied likely include Bacon, Herbert, Hobbes, Crashaw, Browne, Cavendish, and Bunyan.  The semester's investigation of the struggles over what it means to express, communicate, and represent will culminate in a look at Restoration England's Universal and Artificial Language Movement, with its signal achievement in John Wilkins's 1668 Essay Towards a Real Character and a Philosophical Language.

New Course Reading List:
Bacon’s The New Atlantis and The Great Instauration; Browne’s Urn Burial and The Garden of Cyrus; Bunyan’s Pilgrim's Progress; Cavendish’s Blazing World and Observations upon Experimental Philosophy; Crashaw’s Steps to the Temple; Herbert’s The Temple; Hobbes’ Leviathan; and Wilkins’s Essay Towards a Real Character and a Philosophical Language

New Course Method of Evaluation and Course Requirements:
25% shorter essay 6-8 pages, 60% longer essay 15-18 pages, 15% class participation

Term: S-TERM (January 2022 to April 2022)
Date/Time: 6:00 pm to 8:00 pm, Tuesdays
Location: 
RM JHB 616 (Room Change) (Jackman Humanities Building, University of Toronto, 170 St. George Street)
Delivery: IN-PERSON

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ENG2484HF
Thomas Heywood and the Early Modern Theater
K. Williams

New Course Description:
This course will serve as an introduction to a broad sweep of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century English drama through the works of Thomas Heywood, the playwright who famously claimed to have had "an entire hand, or at least a maine finger" in more than two hundred plays. (We will not read all of them.) Concentrating primarily on Heywood's dramatic texts, with short excursions in his prose works (from English histories to polemical writings), we will use the plays to map the dominant concerns of the early modern theater. Our readings will range across major dramatic genres, from city comedy to domestic tragedy, alongside plays that resist predictable forms and categories, such as the Age plays. Our secondary aim in this course will be to explore Heywood's work through critical approaches to identity that have, in early modern studies, typically focused on Shakespeare's plays. With attention to critical race theory (with The Fair Maid of the West), disability theory (with The Fair Maid of the Exchange, often attributed to Heywood), and feminist theory (with A Woman Killed With Kindness), for example, we will consider how Heywood's plays amplify and complicate key theoretical interventions in early modern studies.

Course Reading List:
Plays, likely including: The Fair Maid of the West, Parts 1 and 2; The Fair Maid of the Exchange; A Woman Killed With Kindness; The Four Prentices of London; The Golden Age; The Silver Age; The Brazen Age; If You Know Not Me, You Know Nobody; Selected critical readings.

Course Method of Evaluation and Course Requirements:
Perfect attendance and engaged participation in seminar discussions, 20%; Short responses, 30%; Final research paper (c. 6,000 words), 50%

Term: F-TERM (September 2021 to December 2021)
Date/Time: 9:00 am to 12:00 pm, Wednesdays
Location: ONLINE - ROOM CHANGE 
Delivery: ONLINE SYNCHRONOUS - DELIVERY CHANGE

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ENG2533HS
Shakespeare's Language
L. Magnusson

Course Description:
If the Muses themselves spoke English, they would speak with "Shakespeare's fine-filed phrase," Francis Meres commented in 1598, suggesting that Shakespeare's linguistic art tapped the emerging potential of the English language and extended its resources. Aiming at methodological advances in close reading attentive to the linguistic texture of cultural and literary texts, this course focuses on Shakespeare's still-resonant language. As shaping contexts, we consider the arts of language promoted by Renaissance humanist education, the dynamics of everyday social dialogue, and variation and language change in Early Modern English. The course draws upon an interdisciplinary collection of readings to test out theories and tools, with attention to rhetoric, discourse analysis and pragmatics, historical sociolinguistics, history of English, and the emerging digital approaches to text analysis and to the "distant reading" of large digital archives. We ask in what ways “the life of Shakespeare’s plays is in the language.” We also ask how new methods of language analysis can extend the reach of other current literary approaches, concerned, for example, with race, environment, gender, or cultural history. While the course models language analysis on Shakespeare's works, it also encourages graduate student researchers to develop advanced reading strategies which they can adapt to the cultural and literary texts of their chosen fields.

Course Reading List:
A collection of methodological readings (usually available online from the library or on Quercus) will supplement the Shakespeare text. If interested in reading ahead, in The Norton Shakespeare, 3rd Edition, gen. ed. Stephen Greenblatt (or similar text), choose among Shakespeare's Love's Labour's Lost, Richard III, Merry Wives of Windsor (especially 4.1), Othello, King Lear, The Tempest, Sonnets. Or read any Shakespeare play you want to focus your seminar research on. For classic texts on “social discourse,” you can read M. M. Bakhtin, from The Dialogic Imagination (1981), pp. 259-300 and Pierre Bourdieu, “Economics of Linguistic Exchanges,” Social Sciences Information, 16 (1977): 645-68. On language change, try Sylvia Adamson, “Questions of Identity in Renaissance Drama: New Historicism Meets Old Philology,” Shakespeare Quarterly 61.1 (Spring 2010): 56-77. On early modern schooling, try Peter Mack, Ch. 1, "Rhetoric in the Grammar School," Elizabethan Rhetoric: Theory and Practice, pp. 11-47 and Lynn Enterline, “Imitate and Punish” in Shakespeare’s Schoolroom, pp. 32-61. Or, to get an initial sense of digital text analysis, check out Voyant Tools: < http://voyant-tools.org/ > and use your knowledge and imagination to see what you can discover about some specific feature of Shakespeare's language.

Course Method of Evaluation and Course Requirements:
In-class seminar 20%; course paper (proposal, presentation, and final paper) 55%; frequent short "issue" sheets and "first word" 15%; class participation 10%

Term: S-TERM (January 2022 to April 2022)
Date/Time: 3:00 pm to 6:00 pm, Mondays
Location:
 RM JHB 616 (Room Change) (Jackman Humanities Building, University of Toronto, 170 St. George Street)
Delivery: IN-PERSON

 

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