Department of English

University of Toronto

4000 Series Course Descriptions

ENG4154HS
Wordsworth: Poetry, Context, and Interpretation
A. Bewell

Course Description:
A study of the poetry of Wordsworth with a view to understanding its importance, historical contexts, and theoretical interpretation. This course will provide students with an opportunity to get to know an author in depth and also to gain a better knowledge of the range and diversity of contemporary criticism. In addition to reading Wordsworth's major poetry and prose, students will also read some of what Wordsworth read, notably works by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Dorothy Wordsworth, and Erasmus Darwin.

Course Reading List:
The major poetry of Wordsworth and some of the writers that influenced him. Contemporary criticism on Wordsworth's writings. Any major collection of Wordsworth's poetry will suffice, but students should ensure that they have an edition of The Prelude that includes both the 1805 and 1850 versions. Additional readings will be supplied digitally.

Course Method of Evaluation and Course Requirements:
A book review (1500-2000 words) (25%), a research paper of approximately 15 pages (40%), class presentation (25%) seminar participation (10%).

Term: S-TERM (January 2022 to April 2022)
Date/Time: 9:00 am to 12:00 pm, Fridays
Location: RM JHB 616 (Room Change) (Jackman Humanities Building, University of Toronto, 170 St. George Street)

Delivery: IN-PERSON

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ENG4722HF
Reparative Readings of Victorian Fiction 
A. Jaffe 

Course Description:
This course will invite students to reconsider the reading of a canonical Victorian novel in light of urgent, present-day issues, including social, economic, and environmental concerns as well as issues that arise in direct response to student interests. We will read Dickens's Bleak House through different reparative lenses, including feminism; economic inequality; social and class inequality ideas of and analogies to racial difference; questions of managing bodies, including population control and the management of disease. Exploring in theory and practice what it means to re-situate the Victorians in this way, we will consider what it means to study Victorian novels in the present day.

Course Reading List:
Dickens, Bleak House; critical work by (among others) John Kucich; Daniel Hack; Emily Steinlight. Carolyn Betensky; Nancy Armstrong.

Course Method of Evaluation and Course Requirements:
Essay/Research Paper (60%); Seminar Presentation (10%); Mini-Conference Paper (10%); Participation (20%).

Term: F-TERM (September 2021 to December 2021)
Date/Time: 12:00 pm to 2:00 pm, Tuesdays
Location:
JHB 100A (Jackman Humanities Building, University of Toronto, 170 St. George Street)
Delivery: IN-PERSON ** First two weeks of classes in September 2021 taught online.

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ENG4770HS
Aesthetics and Ethics: the Late Victorians 
H. Li 

Course Description:
This course examines the late Victorians' intellectual efforts to move beyond mid-Victorian culture. In particular, we will focus on their conception of the relations between aesthetics and ethics, as a paradigm shift away from mid-Victorian ideas of ethics, which were primarily rational and prescriptive. By analyzing experimental forms of cognitive aesthetics in George Eliot, William Morris, Robert Browning, Thomas Hardy, Walter Pater and Oscar Wilde, we will reconstruct a contestatory conception of ethics in these writers that was ironic, sensory, and counter-factual, a new "higher ethics" (Walter Pater). Issues to be discussed include ethology of skepticism, dialectics of futuristic envisioning, utopian superscription, naturalistic affect, and feelings as the intellect.

Course Reading List:
Walter Pater, The Renaissance (1873 and 1893); George Eliot, Daniel Deronda (1876); William Morris, News from Nowhere (1890) ; Oscar Wilde, Picture of Dorian Gray (1890), De Profundis (1905); Thomas Hardy, Jude the Obscure (1895)
There will also be a list of secondary critical works on the late Victorians and theoretical works on the relations between aesthetics and ethics.

Course Method of Evaluation and Course Requirements:
One Seminar Presentation (10 - 15 minutes): 25%; One Major Essay (3,500 - 4,000 words): 55%; informed class participation (including Quercus responses and mini-conference participation): 20%.

Term: S-TERM (January 2022 to April 2022)
Date/Time: 5:00 pm to 7:00 pm, Thursdays
Location: RM BL 312 (Claude T. Bissell Building, 140 St. George Street, Toronto, ON, M5S 3G6)
Delivery: IN-PERSON 

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ENG4904HS
Slavery and Anti-Slavery in the Ante-Bellum United States
P. Downes 

Course Description:
This course will examine essays, stories, poems, autobiographies and other writings associated with the expansion of and resistance to enslaved labour in the United States between the American Revolution and the Civil War. The course will also trace the effects of a disavowed relationship to slavery and racial violence on major texts of the period.

New Course Reading List:
Douglass, Selected Writings; Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl Walker, Appeal to the Colored Citizens of the World; Selected Anti-Slavery Pamphlets; Thoreau, selected anti-slavery essays Melville, Benito Cereno Fitzhugh, Cannibals All

New Course Method of Evaluation and Course Requirements:
Presentation: 20% Essay: 60% Participation: 20%

Term: S-TERM (January 2022 to April 2022)
Date/Time: 1:00 pm to 3:00 pm, Wednesdays
Location: 
RM JHB 718 (Room Change) (Jackman Humanities Building, University of Toronto, 170 St. George Street)
Delivery: IN-PERSON

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