Department of English

University of Toronto

1000 Series 2011-12

ENG1001HF
A. ORCHARD
OLD ENGLISH I

An introduction for reading knowledge to the oldest literary form of English, with discussion of readings drawn from the surviving prose and verse literature.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Lecture, language drill, and discussion.

Bruce Mitchell & Fred C. Robinson, A Guide to Old English, 7th ed (Blackwell, 2007).

Previous acquaintance with Latin, German, or other highly inflected language is useful but not essential.

Date & Time: Tuesday 9 - 11am
Room: TR 24, Trinity College


ENG1002HS
A. HEALEY
OLD ENGLISH II (BEOWULF)

Course Description:


This course is devoted to a reading of Beowulf, within the context of the English heroic age. The heroic concepts and values which inform the poem will be analyzed primarily through the poet’s linguistic choices and rhetorical strategies: the poetic compounds he coins or appropriates, his appositions, variations, and digressions. Language will be used as a tool to explore cultural questions such as the manipulation of kindred and ethnic affinities and the constructions of legitimate and illegitimate violence. In addition, we will be concerned with questions of dating, of meter, of the authority of the manuscript, of the poem in its manuscript context, and, finally, of the evidence of archaeology.

Readings:

Edition: R.D. Fulk, Robert E. Bjork, and John D. Niles, eds. Klaeber’s Beowulf, 4th ed. (Toronto: Univ. of Toronto Press 2008).
 
Secondary: Robert Bjork and John Niles, eds., A Beowulf Handbook (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1997); Andy Orchard, A Critical Companion to Beowulf (Cambridge: Brewer 2003); Eileen A. Joy and Mary K. Ramsay, eds., The Post-Modern Beowulf (Morgantown: West Virginia Univ. Press 2006).

Course Requirements:

The class will meet twice a week for 1½ hours each. Class time will be spent in lecture, discussion, and in translation of the poem. Each student will be expected to lead two seminars (with a 1-2 page critique handed in at the time of the seminar). There will be a mid-term translation test, and a final paper (10-15 pages). Evaluation: class work 15%; seminars (2) 10% each; translation test 25%; essay 40%.

ENG 1001F or its equivalent is essential.

Date & Time: Tuesday & Thursday – 9 – 10:30 am
Room: 14284, Robarts DOE


ENG1008HF
W. ROBINS
MEDIEVAL ENTERTAINERS

A study of the role of performers and entertainers in the creation, delivery, and transmission of literary forms in late medieval England (ca. 1066-1550). In the first part of the course we will consider the methodological and definitional problems presented by minstrels and other medieval entertainers; the historical evidence of minstrel activity, the representation of minstrels in medieval art and literature; and the dynamics of medieval performativity in general. In the second part we will examine several Middle English works (poetry, drama, music, and storytelling) where we can see minstrel traditions undergoing transformation as they are invoked, incorporated into, and challenged by more elite, literate modes of literary discourse. Exploring the complex interactions of orality and literacy, learned discourse and popular traditions, text and music, memory and manuscript, and authoritative and subversive forms of expression, we will assess how the activities of public entertainers, as well as cultural anxieties about them, helped shape the vernacular literary cultures of late medieval England.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

New Course Reading List: Texts will include Middle English romances of King Horn, Sir Orfeo, and Sir Cleges; selections from Langland's Piers Plowman and Chaucer's Canterbury Tales; ballads of Robin Hood and other topics; and some early-modern broadsides.

New Course Method of Evaluation and Course Requirements: Active and informed participation in class discussion (10%), an in-class presentation (20%), two short bibliographical reviews (10% each), and a final research paper (15-20 pages) (50%).

Date & Time: Tuesday 3 – 5 pm
Room: VC 211, Victoria College 


ENG1552HS
S. C. AKBARI
CHAUCER’S TROILUS AND CRISEYDE AND OTHER POEMS

Courses on Chaucer generally focus primarily on the Canterbury Tales, seen in modern times as the highest literary achievement of the preeminent author of the English Middle Ages. Medieval and early modern readers felt rather differently, however: for them Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde was the literary achievement that set the English poet in the ranks of Dante and Petrarch. This course includes a close reading of Troilus and Criseyde in the light of its European sources and analogues, including works by Boethius and Boccaccio, as well as an engagement with the philosophical texts that influenced Chaucer’s presentation of introspective thought in the figure of Criseyde. Chaucer’s dream visions – the Book of the Duchess, the House of Fame, and the Parliament of Fowls – will also be studied in the light of medieval philosophy and allegory.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Students will be expected to participate regularly in seminar discussions and to offer several short, informal oral presentations. Grade breakdown is as follows: seminar participation (20%); short presentations (20%); abstract (500 words; 10%); research paper (5000 words; 50%).

Date & Time: Monday 3 – 6 pm
Room: UC F204, University College 


MST 3112S
F. MICHELET
GEOGRAPHY AND IDENTITY IN OLD AND MIDDLE ENGLISH LITERATURE
(*NOTE: This course is also posted under Cross Listed Courses here.)

This seminar will explore the links uniting localization and identity in a selection of Old and Middle English texts. It will examine what is at stake in geographical positioning and how a collective sense of self can be expressed in spatial terms. Related issues, for instance the constructions of centres and peripheries, the drawing of boundaries, strategies of ‘othering’, or the opposition between the familiar world and the wilderness, will also be addressed.

Date & Time: Friday 2 – 4 pm
Room: 301, Lillian Massey


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