Department of English

University of Toronto

2011 Summer Session

 2011 Summer Session Graduate Courses

ENG5076HF
THEORIZING THE CARIBBEAN DIASPORA
C. CAMPBELL

When theorist James Clifford declared, “We are all Caribbeans now in our urban archipelagos,” he was suggesting, among other things, the centrality of the idea of “the Caribbean” to “diaspora.” In this course we will explore the ways in which these two concepts are mutually constitutive, by examining both the Caribbean diaspora and the Caribbean as diaspora. We will read critical and creative texts as explanatory frameworks for thinking through key terms such as transnationism, belonging, home, nation citizenship and migration.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Participation; presentation; and a research paper.

Texts: Brent Hayes Edwards, The Practice of Diaspora; NourbeSe Philip, Zong; Derek Walcott, Selected Poems; Paule Marshall, Brown Girl, Brownstones; Claud McKay, Home to Harlem; Paul Gilroy, The Black Atlantic; James Clifford, Routes: Travel and Translation I the Late Twentieth Century; Dionne Brand, Map to the Door of No Return.

Session Dates: May 10 - June 23, 2011
Day and Time: Tuesday and Thursday, 11:00 am - 1:00 pm
Room: Jackman Humanities Building, room 616

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ENG5585Y** NOTE: COURSE CANCELLED
"HERE'S TO GOOD OLD D. H. LAWRENCE": LAWRENCE'S INFLUENCE ON THE TWENTIETH-CENTURY
S. SOLECKI

ENG5977HF (NOTE: NEW COURSE ADDED MARCH 31 2011)
WALLACE STEVENS IN CONTEXT
M. WOODLAND


A survey of the poetry and prose of Wallace Stevens. In this course, we will engage closely with the complex, playful, and often self-reflexive verbal surface of Stevens’ poetry; we will give attention to the shifts in style and content that mark the various “phases” of his career, and to the influence of external events (the depression, WWII) on these elements; we will investigate the roles of “abstraction” and the “supreme fiction” in his work; we will also consider how different critics have identified Stevens’ place in literary history—belated Romantic (Bloom, Vendler, Whiting, et al.), Modernist (Lentricchia, Altieri, Perloff, et al.), Postmodernist (Riddell, Jarraway et al.)—and explore the particular interpretive and ideological issues at stake in such claims.

Readings:
Wallace Stevens, The Collected Poetry and Prose (Library of America); Eleanor Cook, A Reader’s Guide to Wallace Stevens (Princeton).

Course Requirements:
Seminar participation (15%); one class presentation (10%), which must be revised and submitted as short essay (15%); one major paper (60%).

Session Dates: May 9 – June 20, 2011 (NOTE: NEW COURSE ADDED MARCH 31 2011)
Day and Time: Monday & Wednesday, 11am – 1 pm
Room:  Jackman Humanities Building, Room 718

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ENG6160HF
POLITICS AND POETIC FORM
M. NYQUIST


In this course, we will be studying early modern debates about and poetic instances of “blank” as opposed to “rhymed” verse, together with contemporary debates about the relative merits of “free” as opposed to conventional poetic sub-genres or forms. More generally, we will be exploring questions such as, how do specific poetic sub-genres or forms become associated with particular political attitudes or beliefs? In what ways have poets from marginalized communities eschewed or appropriated conventional genres, sub-genres or poetic forms? To focus this study, we will look at some of the ways the poetry of Shakespeare and Milton have been taken up by later writers, paying special attention to feminist and anti-colonialist poetry.

Course Work: Two seminar facilitations; one critical review essay; one final essay; participation

Texts: TBA

Session Dates: May 9 - June 23, 2011
Day and Time: Monday and Thursday, 1:00 - 4:00 pm*
  (*NOTE TIME CHANGES)
Room: Jackman Humanities Building, room  617

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ENG6223HF
R. MCLEOD
THE TEXT OF DONNE: THE VARIORUM DONNE


The Variorum Donne, now being published from Indiana University Press, establishes its text on an exhaustive collation of all early witnesses and a selective collation of modern editions. The course will examine in detail how this monumental and complex edition functions and assess how it is profoundly revising our sense of the text of Donne. The course will also critique this and earlier stages of editorial behaviour on the basis of photographs of the seventy surviving early-seventeenth-century manuscripts of “To his Mistress Going to Bed” (a facsimile edition of which I am now preparing). Students can expect to become proficient in reading early manuscripts (a function formerly carried out for Early-Modern specialists by the department’s once mandatory Bibliography 2, now discontinued) and in assessing the ambiguity and instability of their texts. Essays in the course can be literary-interpretive, but they will need to ground the literary in documentary evidence and the history of its reception, especially of its misperception.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Several exercises on transcription of early-modern handwriting and critiquing of editorial practice; these will be commented on but not graded. A shorter paper (20%) and a longer (80%), both to be submitted for critique in draft, to be followed by revision for grading. The shorter paper can be the basis of the longer.

Session Dates: May 9 to June 22, 2011
Day and Time: Monday and Wednesday,  9:00 to 11:00 am
Room: Jackman Humanities Building, room  718


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ENG6546HF
LITERATURE AND THE RESISTANCE TO BEING
N. MORGENSTERN


Referring to the June 2006 suicides of three detainees at Guantanamo Bay, Rear Admiral Harry Harris, Camp Commander, insisted: “They have no regard for life, either ours or their own. I believe this was not an act of desperation, but an act of asymmetrical warfare waged against us.” This admittedly hyperbolic example condenses a series of questions and enigmas that we will try to come to terms with in this course. Drawing on literary texts from nineteenth and twenty -century America and a range of supplementary philosophical readings, we will examine representations of the renunciation of—or the resistance to—being and of the responses such resistance generates. Is relationship always struggling with a resistance to being? Does a lack of regard for life always have to be experienced as violence by those who are forced to witness it? If the Declaration of Independence asserts certain “inalienable rights . . . among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness,” is there also a right to death (a human right to resist being)? Or is “life” a sacred value that must be protected at all costs? How might one articulate questions of sovereign power and the particular history of the death penalty in relationship to individual rights? These are ethical and political questions of wide import, but they are also questions about language and communication that demand a specifically literary intervention.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Components: participation, seminar presentation, final seminar paper.

Readings may include: Brown, Edgar Huntly; Hawthorne, “Roger Malvin’s Burial”; Melville, “Bartleby, The Scrivener”; Poe, “Imp of the Perverse”, “The Raven”; Thoreau, “A Plea for Captain John Brown”; Chopin, The Awakening; Cather, The Professor's House; Hemingway, “The Killers”; Munro, “Deep-Holes,” “My Mother's Dream,” “Post and Beam”; Gillespie, Dir. Lars and the Real Girl; Morrison, Beloved; Ozick, The Shawl.

Course Reader (may include works by Derrida, Laplanche, Freud, Agamben, Winnicott, Foucauilt, Edelman and others).

Session Dates: May 10 - June 21, 2011
Day and Time: Tuesday and Thursday, 9:00 - 11:00 am
Room: Jackman Humanities Building, room 718

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