Department of English

University of Toronto

2012 Summer Courses

Summer 2012 Session

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Summer 2012 Graduate Studies Timetable

Time

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

10am-12pm ENG5966HF
English
Literature
WWII
J. Patrick
Birge
Carnegie
Library VC,
Room 20
May 15 -
June 21
ENG5966HF
English
Literature
WWII
J. Patrick
Birge
Carnegie
Library VC,
Room 20
May 15 -
June 21
11am-1pm ENG4197HF
Romanticism
& the Rise of
Consumerism
A. Bewell
JHB 616
Class begins
May 7 and
ends June 20.
Please note:
there will
be no classes
week of
June 4-8
ENG4197HF
Romanticism
& the Rise of
Consumerism
A. Bewell
JHB 616
Class begins
May 7 and
ends June 20.
Please note:
there will
be no classes
week of
June 4-8
1pm-4pm ENG2002HF
E. Harvey
Early Modern
Ecologies
JHB616
(see Thursday)
There will be
two Tuesday
classes on
May 15th &
29th, 1 - 4pm
in JHB718



ENG2002HF
E. Harvey
Early Modern
Ecologies
JHB616
Please note
dates of course:
May 10, 15, 17,
29, 31; June 7,
14, 21.
There will be
two Tuesday
classes on
May 15th &
29th, 1 - 4 pm
in JHB718
2pm-4pm ENG6054HF
U. Esonwanne
Construals of
Self:
Autobiography
in Africa and
the Diaspora
JHB 617
Please note:
class starts
on a Wednesday
May 9-June 20
ENG6054HF
U. Esonwanne
Construals of
Self:
Autobiography
in Africa and
the Diaspora
JHB 617
Please note:
class starts
on a Wednesday
May 9-June 20


Summer 2012 Graduate Course Descriptions

ENG2002HF
Early Modern Ecologies
E. Harvey

Course Description:

Although ecology is a nineteenth-century coinage, it names the delicate relationship between the body and the environment that was central to classical and early modern thought. Drawing on research emerging from ambient studies and historical phenomenology, this course will explore changing representations of the ligature between the human and the ambient world. We will examine theories of the earth as a living body, the history of atomism, geohumoralism (the idea that the body and temperament are shaped by the environment), the rise of the new science in the early seventeenth century, natural history as a genre, experimental method, treatises on horticulture and grafting, histories of air, magnetism, and spirits, the doctrine of sympathies, and changing concepts of health and disease. Our consideration will encompass not only transformed epistemologies but also emotional responses to the new knowledge, unforgettably articulated in John Donne's lament in the First Anniversary: "the new Philosophy calls all in doubt." The reading list will include works by Plato, Lucretius, Ovid, Donne, Bacon, Burton, Marvell, and Shakespeare, as well as a range of theoretical and critical texts (Agamben, Serres, Sheldrake, Sullivan and Floyd-Wilson, Bruce Smith).

Reading List:

Lucretius, De Rerum Natura; Ovid, Metamorphoses; John Donne, Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions, Anniversaries; Ignatius, His Conclave; William Gilbert, De Magnete; Francis Bacon, Sylva Sylvarum; Andrew Marvell, Upon Appleton House, Mower Poems; Robert Burton, Anatomy of Melancholy (selections); William Shakespeare, Cymbeline, The Tempest, The Winter's Tale; Bruce Smith, Key of Green; Mary Floyd-Wilson and Garrett Sullivan, Environment and Embodiment in Early Modern England; Giorgio Agamben, The Signature of All Things: On Method Michel Serres, The Birth of Physics; Rupert Sheldrake, A New Science of Life New.

Course Requirements:

Oral presentation (25%), active participation in class discussion (10%), prospectus for research essay and bibliography (15%), and one research essay (15-20 pages) (50%).

Please note: the class will be held on the following Thursday dates: May 10, 17, 31; June 7, 14, 21. In addition, there will be two Tuesday classes on the following dates: May 15 & 29 - 1 – 4 pm. These classes will be held in JHB 718.
Thursday – 1 – 4 pm
Jackman Humanities Building, Room 616
Tuesday – 1 – 4 pm (May 15 & 29, 2012 only)
Jackman Humanities Building, Room 718


ENG4197HF  ("METHODS" COURSE)
Romanticism and the Rise of Consumerism
A. Bewell

As recent social historians have suggested, the industrial revolution of the latter part of the eighteenth century was built not only on a revolution in production, but also on a revolution in the consumption of material goods. The material of everyday life underwent a radical transformation, particularly with the massive influx of colonial goods into Britain, from new foods and drinks, such as coffee, chocolate, tea, and sugar, to a whole range of new luxury items, from European prints, classical antiquities, and exotic artefacts to nursery plants, fabrics, and Chinese porcelain. In this course we will look at how writers during the Romantic period responded to these new circumstances, particularly in a context in which literature was associated with luxury. Particular focus will be given to William Wordsworth’s attack upon luxury, the cultural debates concerning Leigh Hunt and ‘the Cockney School of poetry,” John Keats’s extensive reflection on consumption in his poetry, Thomas De Quincey’s work on the dangers of imperial consumption, his Confessions of an English Opium Eater, and on the role that ideas of gender and luxury played in women’s poetry.

Course Requirements: web-site contributions (20%, see below); book review (20%, see below); term paper (50%); seminar participation (10%).

Course texts: One text, De Quincey’s Confessions of an English Opium Eater (Penguin) has been ordered for the class and is available at the Bob Miller Bookroom. (A small number of Duncan Wu’s Romanticism: An Anthology have also been ordered.) I will be making most of the less easily obtainable poems and essays available online at the course-website, so many of these can be downloaded from there. Please use your own anthology for the more common poems. If you do not have copies of the more common poems, these can be located on the Literature Online site through the university library web-site. For eighteenth-century texts and for research of texts published before 1800, you are encouraged to access Eighteenth Century Collections Online, through the library web-site.

Class begins May 7th and ends on June 20th.
Please note: There will be no classes the week of June 4 – 8th.
Monday & Wednesday – 11 am – 1 pm
Jackman Humanities Building, Room 616


ENG5050HS  COURSE CANCELLED  FOR 2012 SUMMER SESSION - WILL BE OFFERED IN SPRING 2013.
N. DOLAN
LITERATURE, LAW AND LIBERAL CULTURE IN THE UNITED STATES 1776-1865

ENG5966HF
English Literature of the Second World War
J. Patrick

Course Description:

A survey of poetry, and verse drama, written in England just before, during, and at the end of the Second World War, by W. H Auden, Louis MacNeice, T. S. Eliot, H. D. [Hilda Doolittle] and Dylan Thomas. The course will concentrate on both lyrics and long poems, and among the latter will be MacNeice’s Autumn Journal (1938); Eliot’s Four Quartets (1936; 1940; 1941; 1942; collected, 1943-44); Auden’s The Sea and the Mirror (1944) and H. D.’s Trilogy (1944-46). Eliot and H. D. are modernists, Auden and MacNeice, ‘thirties’ poets, and Thomas uncategorisable, and yet a principal goal of the course will be to assess the effects of the war on such different writers and to do so with particular attention to their movements (differently motivated, and in different directions) between England and the United States.

Preliminary reading list:

Auden, The English Auden, ed. E. Mendelson; MacNeice, Collected Poems, ed. P. McDonald; Eliot, Four Quartets [any edition].

Two seminar papers (15% x 2 = 30%); final research paper (70%).

Tuesday & Thursday – 10 -12 pm *Class will begin on May 15th and end June 21st
VC Birge Carnegie Library, Room 20
 
ENG6054HF
Construals of the Self: Autobiography in Africa and the Diaspora
U. Esonwanne

Course Description:

I and We/Either I am nobody or/I am a nation”: in these lines from The Schooner Flight, Derek Walcott neatly sums up the choices that confront writers in the Diaspora. In Africa, writers expose their characters to a similar predicament: to which self, the bourgeois or the communal, should they subscribe? Writer or character, each is riven by a competing urge: either declare her autonomy or subscribe to the axiom that ‘Mothoke motho ka batho ba bang’ (“a person is a person only through others”). Since autobiography (fiction and non–fiction) is, of all literary genres, that which is most directly concerned with self–making, it has hardly surprising that, from the 18th century on, writers in Africa and the Diaspora have turned to autobiography both to negate prior and contemporary negations of the African self and to construe an alternative self – that is, to analyze its structure, interpret its meaning, and translate it loudly to the world. But while negating prior negations of the self has been a relatively easy task, construing an alternative self has proven more difficult. First, the epistemological: Frantz Fanon asserts that recapturing and scrutinizing the self are the essential prerequisites necessary for bringing “a human world” into being. But self–recuperation, which presupposes a self that is temporally anterior to the subject and infrangibly linked to the past, brings us up against an epistemological dilemma neatly summed up by Nietzsche: “Was the person created out of a conception, or the conception out of a person?” Second, the conceptual: what notions of the self do African and Diasporic autobiographies elaborate, and how are they related to each other? Third, the categorical: how should we classify these notions, and what is the morphology? These questions, and others, will animate our reading of a broad variety of autobiographical writings.

Texts (depending on availability):
NOTE: UPDATED April 2, 2012

Course reader
St. Augustine, The Confessions of St. Augustine (Oxford UP, 1998)
J.M. Coetzee, Summertime: Scenes from a Provincial Life (Harvill Secker, 2009)
Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave (Oxford UP, 1999)
Alexandra Fuller, Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs Tonight (Random House, 2001)
Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Colored people: a memoir (Knopf, 1994)
Zora Neale Hurston, Dust Tracks on a Road [1942] (U of Illinois P, 1984)
Harriet A. Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, Written by Herself (Harvard UP, 2000)
George Lamming, In the Castle of My Skin [1953] (U of Michigan P, 1991)
Binyavanga Wainaina, One Day I Will Write About This Place (Graywolf Press, 2011)
Malcolm X, The Autobiography of Malcolm X as Told to Alex Haley (Ballantine Books, 1992)

Course Requirements:

Course conduct will consist of open discussions, seminar presentations and, where necessary, lectures. Evaluation: participation 10%; seminar presentation 30%; mini–conference presentation 20%; research essay 40%. 

Monday and Wednesday – 2 – 4 pm  *Please note: Class begins on Wednesday May 9th and ends on Wednesday, June 20th. 
Jackman  Humanities Building, Room 617 


ENG6211HF  COURSE CANCELLED  FOR 2012 SUMMER SESSION
R. MCLEOD
ARCHEOLOGY OF THE BOOK 

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