Department of English

University of Toronto

2013 Summer Courses


2013 Summer Graduate Timetable

Time

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

10 am - 12 noon

ENG4227HF
Romantic Elegy: The Formalism of Loss
K. Weisman
2 hours
Room JHB614 *
The course will run between May 13 and June 19.
*CHANGE OF CLASSROOM
ENG6028HF
Religion, Secularism and the Novel
M. Knight
2 hours
Room JHB718
The course will run between May 14 and June 27, but will not meet on May 28 and May 30.
ENG4227HF 
Romantic Elegy: The Formalism of Loss
K. Weisman
2 hours
Room JHB614 *
The course will run between May 13 and June 19.
*CHANGE OF CLASSROOM
ENG6028HF 
Religion, Secularism and the Novel
M. Knight
2 hours
Room JHB718
The course will run between May 14 and June 27, but will not meet on May 28 and May 30.

12 noon - 1 pm

1 pm - 4 pm

ENG6193HF
Communities of  Readers
H. Murray
3 hours
Room JHB616
The course will run between May 13 and June 26, but will not meet on June 3 and
June 5.
ENG2021HF
The Global Renaissance M. Rubright
3 hours
Room JHB616
The course will run between May 14 and June 20.
ENG6193HF
Communities of Readers
H. Murray
3 hours
Room JHB616
The course will run between May 13 and June 26, but will not
meet on June 3 and June 5.
ENG2021HF
The Global Renaissance M. Rubright
3 hours
Room JHB616
The course will run between May 14 and June 20.

4 pm - 6 pm



2013 Summer Graduate Course Descriptions

ENG2021HF
The Global Renaissance
M. Rubright

Recent scholarship on early modern literature and culture has directed significant attention to the ways in which English culture was going global in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. We will read a variety of critical and literary texts that foreground questions of “globalization” in the Renaissance and evaluate the uses and limits of theories of globalization for understanding representations of England’s real and imagined encounters with “strangers,” both beyond and within its shores. We will toggle between a close study of London as a “world city” struggling to define categories of belonging and estrangement in a period of unprecedented urban expansion, and representations of England’s engagements at the periphery (paying particular attention to Ireland, the Low Countries, Spain, Morocco, and the so-called “spice islands” of the Indonesian archipelago). The figures of encounter that we will explore will be both real/historical (Irishmen, Spaniards, Javans) as well as fictive/indeterminate (Moors, Amazons, Anthropophagi). We will consider how historicist work, new scholarship in race and ethnicity studies, cultural materialism, post-colonial theory, and feminist theory differently construct debates and dialogues about the global Renaissance. English drama will serve as our shared touchstone. We will also explore world atlases, broadsides, anti-alien libels, travel writing, and ethnography for how these various forms generated powerful tropes as well as the period’s “key words” by which the English shaped ideas of human alterity and similitude.

Dramatic works by: William Shakespeare, Thomas Middleton, Thomas Dekker, William Haughton, John Fletcher, John Webster, and others. Readings from: the journals of the first voyage of the English East India Company; Gerhard Mercator, Atlas or a Geographicke Description of the Regions, Countries and Kingdomes of the World (1636); Abraham Ortelius, Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, or the Theatre of the Whole World (1608). Critical and theoretical works by: John M. Archer, Homi K. Bhabha, Jerry Brotton, Michel Foucault, Diana Fuss, Alison Games, Kim Hall, Stuart Hall, Sujata Iyengar, Colin Kidd, Julia Kristeva, Ania Loomba, Michael Neill, Shankar Raman, Edward Said, Dan Vitkus, Mary Floyd-Wilson, Robert Young, and others.

Thomas Fisher Library project 20%; project presentation 10%; book review 10%; methodology review 10%; research prospectus and bibliography 30%; participation (including postings) 20%.

Summer – 3 hours
May 14/June 20 – Tuesdays & Thursdays / 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Jackman Humanities Building, Room 616
Class will begin on Tuesday, May 14th and end Thursday, June 20th.


ENG4227HF
(NOTE: COURSE ADDED Oct 30, 2012) 
Romantic Elegy: The Formalism of Loss
K. Weisman

Course Description:
This course will study elegy and elegiac poetry of the Romantic period, giving special attention to the cultural, social and ideological implications of poetic experimentation in form and genre. For many writers of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth-century, elegy establishes a forum for exploring the conditions of subjectivity. It also complicates such exploration, however, and so many such efforts become negotiations of the reciprocal relationship between the forms of expression and self-identity. Study of the Romantic elegy naturally opens also onto questions about the limits of lyric and the function of the aesthetic. Students will thus have the opportunity to study poetic structure within broader cultural and conceptual frameworks.

Readings:
Poets studied will include (but will not be limited to) the following: William Wordsworth, Charlotte Smith, S.T. Coleridge, Anna Barbauld, John Keats, Percy Shelley, Lord Byron, Letitia Landon.

Course Requirements:
Seminar/discussion. Seminar paper, term paper, oral book report.

Summer – 2 hours
May 13/June 19– Mondays & Wednesdays / 10:00 am - 12:00 noon (+ Tuesday June 11, 10:00 A.M.-12:00)
Jackman Humanities Building, Room 614 *CHANGE OF CLASSROOM
Class will begin on Monday, May 13th and end Wednesday, June 19th.


ENG4669HF (COURSE CANCELLED October 29, 2012)
Nineteenth Century Romance
C. Bolus-Reichert


ENG6028HF
Religion, Secularism and the Novel
M. Knight

Description:
In recent years the ‘secularization thesis’ has been the subject of increasing scrutiny. Religion has been more persistent in western culture than a previous generation of scholars thought it would be; the presuppositions of secular ideology have become easier to see in hindsight; the cultural politics of religion require a critical language that does not shy away from talking about belief; theology has found itself in conversation with theory; and new readings of nineteenth and twentieth century literary history continue to uncover a significant theological element. The interrogation of the secularization thesis has particular consequences for our reading of the novel, a form that has traditionally been thought of as secular or, in the words of Georg Lukacs, the ‘epic of a world that has been abandoned by God’. During this course we will explore the relationship between religion, secularism and the novel. One of the aims of the course is to show the myriad of ways in which religious readings of the novel might be pursued. But the course will also consider the place of the secular in our reading of the religious. Although the secularization thesis needs critique, the secular cannot be dispensed with any more easily than religious thought can be ignored. This, of course, raises the question of the relationship between religion and the secular and this question will be at the heart of the course. In addition to studying a range of novels from the mid-nineteenth century to the present, we will examine the rich and diverse debates accompanying talk of the post-secular, the theoretical turn to religion, postmodern theology, the role of religion in the public sphere, and messianic thought and the sense of the ending.

Preliminary Reading List:
This course will examine six novels and a range of theoretical/critical/theological writing. The novels are likely to include: George Eliot, Silas Marner (1861), Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray (1891), Franz Kafka, The Castle (1926), Flannery O’Connor, Wise Blood (1952), Salman Rushdie, The Satanic Verses (1988), and Cormac McCarthy, The Road (2006). Theorists and theologians discussed are likely to include (grouped by provisional sessions): (a) Ian Watt, Georg Lukacs and George Levine; (b) Max Weber, Steve Bruce and Jurgen Habermas; (c) Jacques Derrida, Walter Benjamin, Paul Fiddes and John Caputo; (d) Charles Taylor, Colin Jaeger, Lori Branch and Stanley Hauerwas; (e) Saba Mahmood, Hent de Vries, Regina Schwarz and Yvonne Sherwood; (f) John Milbank and Slavoj Zizek.

Method of Evaluation:
Seminar Presentation and Related Book Review (30%), Informed Participation (20%), Final Research Paper (50%).

Summer – 2 hours

May 14/June 27* – Tuesdays & Thursdays /10:00 am - 12:00 noon 
Jackman Humanities Building, Room 718
*Class will begin on Tuesday, May 14th and end Thursday, June 27th. NB: The course will not meet on May 28th and May 30th.


ENG6193HF
Communities of Readers
H. Murray


Description
This interdisciplinary course will draw from book history, reader response theory, institutional ethnography, and literacy studies in order to bring readers more strongly into view as subjects for literary/literary theory analysis, and to challenge the common view of reading as an “interior” or isolated activity. Rather, we will focus on reading as a socially-structured practice which involves the group mobilization of readers (into book clubs, reading circles, literacy movements, and fan cultures, for example). Readership communities will be examined historically and today (with special emphasis on web-based reading communities). Course participants will be able to match their course research to other areas of interest (eg. nineteenth-century women readers, romance or scifi cultures, African-Canadian readers).
Students should attempt to read Manguel’s History of Reading before the course begins.

Preliminary Reading List
Much of the work for the course will involve first-hand examination of websites, reading club study guides, television, radio, and online “book clubs,” and similar materials. Students will also be made familiar with nearby archival materials relevant to this course.
Secondary sources will include excerpts from Boyain, Ethnographies of Reading; Long, Book Clubs; Manguel, History of Reading; Pawley, Reading on the Middle Border; Rooney, Reading with Oprah; Sedo, Reading Communities; History of the Book in Canada.

Method of Evaluation
20% seminar participation; 30% in-class presentation (if class size permits) and short paper; 50% final essay.

Summer – 3 hours
May 13/June 26* – Mondays & Wednesdays /1:00 pm - 4:00 pm
  
Jackman Humanities Building, Room 616
*Class will begin on Monday, May 13th and end Wednesday, June 26th. NB: The course will not meet on June 3rd and June 5th.


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