Department of English

University of Toronto

2014 Summer Courses



2014 Summer Graduate Timetable

Time

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

10am - 12noon

ENG6028HF

Religion, Secularism and the Novel

M. Knight

(*NB: starts Wed. May 21 - July 2) Rm:�JHB718

2 hours

ENG6028HF

Religion, Secularism and the Novel

M. Knight

(*NB: starts Wed. May 21 - July 2) Rm:�JHB718

2 hours

10am - 1pm

ENG2423HF

Spenser: The Faerie Queene

D.Galbraith

(Start�& end�date change:
Thursday, May�15*�- Tuesday, June 24, 2014*)�

Rm:�BC 20

3 hours

ENG2423HF

Spenser: The Faerie Queene

D.Galbraith

(Start & end�date change:
Thursday, May�15*�-�Tuesday, June 24, 2014*)�
Rm: BC 20

3 hours

2pm - 4pm

ENG5282HF

American Modernity

D. Seitler

(May 13 - Jun 19) Rm.�JHB718

2 hours

ENG5282HF

American Modernity

D. Seitler

(May 13 - Jun 19) Rm.�JHB718

2 hours

�5pm - 8pm

ENG6160HF

Politics and Poetic Form

M. Nyquist

(May 13 - Jun 19) Rm.�JHB718

3 hours

"Methods Course" (Studies in Poetics)

ENG6160HF

Politics and Poetic Form

M. Nyquist

(May 12 - Jun 23) Rm.�JHB718

3 hours

"Methods Course" (Studies in Poetics)


Summer 2014 Graduate Course Descriptions


ENG2423HF
Spenser: The Faerie Queene
D. Galbraith

Description
This seminar will examine The Faerie Queene from a variety of perspectives: its place in Spenser's career (and in his and his contemporaries' conceptions of "a literary career"), its relationship to Renaissance theories and practices of the epic poem and its classical precedents, its impact on the literary culture of the 1590s, and its engagement with contemporary debates on nationality and politics. Although we shall read the entire poem, some books may be selected for more detailed attention, depending on the interests of members of the class.�

Course Requirements
Seminar.

The Faerie Queene, ed. A.C. Hamilton (Longman); The Shorter Poems, ed. Richard A. McCabe (Penguin).�

Assessment
Active participation 20%; seminar (passage analysis) 10%; seminar (critical problem) 20%; final essay 50%.

Summer - 3 hours
Date/Time:�Tuesday/Thursday, �May 15* - June 19, 2014; 10:00am - 1:00pm
Room:�BC 20 (Birge-Carnegie Library, Victoria College)�

(* NB:�We�have had�to move the first class of ENG 2423, “The Faerie Queene,” from Tuesday�May 13 to Thursday�May 15.�One class will be added�to make up for this class, the date TBD.� Please see BLACKBOARD for important information about the readings for the�first class.)

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ENG5282HF
American Modernity
D. Seitler

Course Description
What is the modern? Is it the new? The avant-garde? A break with the past? According to Max Weber’s and Michel Foucault’s accounts, modernity is the rise of various strategies for “rationalizing” or “disciplining” human life. For J�rgen Habermas, it is a project whose emphasis on reason needs to be thought apart from the effects of capitalist rationalization. Either way, modernity is posited as at once a historical period, a set of aesthetic practices and institutional forms, and a political and philosophical problem. This course will take up these understandings by studying late-nineteenth and early twentieth-century American literature in which questions of modernity and modernization appear as central concerns. We will read a wide range of materials that will help us to consider the inter-penetrating forces of change and upheaval that can be said to characterize both the idea and the experience of the modern as modern—forces of industry, technology, science, war, massification, rationalization, and so forth. The culture of performance, modes of consumption, location and dislocation, the urban and the rural, the problems and the politics of aesthetics, the rise of the cinema and hand-held photography, technologies of personhood, the discourse of disease and contagion, the department store, the city street, and the modern woman will all be considered.

Course Requirements
Seminar presentation (20%), abstract (15%), participation (20%), final research paper (45%).

Summer –� 2 hours
Day/Time: Tuesday/Thursday, May 13 - June 19, 2014; 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Room: JHB718, Jackman Humanities Building


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ENG6028HF
Religion, Secularism and the Novel
M. Knight

Course Description
In recent years the "secularization thesis" has been the subject of increasing scrutiny. Religion has been more persistent in western culture than a previous generation of scholars thought it would be; the presuppositions of secular ideology have become easier to see in hindsight; the cultural politics of religion require a critical language that does not shy away from talking about belief; theology has found itself in conversation with theory; and new readings of literary history from the nineteenth century to the present continue to uncover a significant theological element. The interrogation of the secularization thesis has particular consequences for our reading of the novel, a form that has traditionally been thought of as secular or, in the words of Georg Lukacs, the "epic of a world that has been abandoned by God". During this course we will explore the relationship between religion, secularism and the novel. One of the aims of the course is to show the myriad of ways in which religious readings of the novel might be pursued. But the course will also consider the place of the secular in our reading of the religious. Although the secularization thesis needs critique, the secular cannot be dispensed with any more easily than religious thought can be ignored. This, of course, raises the question of the relationship between religion and the secular, as Charles Taylor and others have discussed. In addition to studying a range of novels from the mid-nineteenth century to the present, we will examine the rich and diverse debates accompanying talk of the post-secular, the theoretical turn to religion, postmodern theology, the role of religion in the public sphere, the immanent frame, messianic thought and the sense of an ending.

Preliminary Reading List
This course will examine 5-6 novels and a range of theoretical/critical/theological writing. The novels are likely to include: George Eliot, Silas Marner (1861), Franz Kafka, The Castle (1926), Flannery O’Connor, Wise Blood (1952), Salman Rushdie, The Satanic Verses (1988), and Cormac McCarthy, The Road (2006). Theorists, critics and theologians discussed are likely to include: Giorgio Agamben, Lori Branch, Steve Bruce, John Caputo, Jacques Derrida, Stanley Hauerwas, George Levine, Saba Mahmood, Charles Taylor, and Yvonne Sherwood.

Method of Evaluation
Seminar Presentation and Related Book Review (30%), Informed Participation (20%), Final Research Paper (50%).

Summer – 2 hours
Day/Time: Monday/Wednesday (May 21, 2014�- July 2, 2014 [NB*First class Wednesday, May 21. �June 30 is a�UofT�holiday]; 10:00am - 12:00noon
Room: JHB718, Jackman Humanities Building


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ENG6160HF�
Politics and Poetic Form
M. Nyquist
"Methods Course" (Studies in Poetics)


Course Description
In this course, you will learn to identify and discuss a variety of poetic forms. We will study some of the institutional and theoretical issues currently being debated, together with the history of specific sub-genres and forms. We will explore questions such as, what is involved in identifying, responding to or interpreting formal features of poetry? What social positions or ideological formations become associated with specific sub-genres or forms? In what ways have poets from marginalized communities eschewed or appropriated conventional genres, sub-genres or poetic forms? To make this workable, we will focus on (1) early modern and contemporary poetry and (2) the sonnet, eclogue and elegy. We will conclude with Walcott’s Omeros as a “post”-colonialist revision of epic.

Texts

Required: Adams, Poetic Designs; Eagleton, How to Read a Poem; Virgil, Eclogues and Georgics, trans. by C.D. Lewis; Derek Walcott, Omeros.
These texts have been ordered through the Bob Miller Bookroom, 180 Bloor St. West, Lower Concourse.
Recommended:
The Poetics of Empire: A Study of James Grainger’s The Sugar Cane (1764) (2000)*
Reading Poetry: An Introduction by Tom Furniss and Michael Bath (2007)
Required Consultation:
The New Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics, eds. Alex Preminger and T.V.F. Brogan
Representative Poetry Online http://eir.library.utoronto.ca/rpo/display/index.cfm��

Course Work

Seminar co-facilitations (2) 30% (15% each)
Class Participation 20%
First Essay, due 12 June 20%
Second Essay, due 11 July 30%

Summer –� 3 hours
Day/Time: Tuesday/Thursday, May 13 - June 19, 2014; 5:00pm - 8:00pm
Room: JHB718, Jackman Humanities Building

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