Department of English

University of Toronto

4000 Level Courses

ENG4222HF
Romanticism and Mobility
A. Bewell

Course Description:

The eighteenth and nineteenth centuries underwent an enormous transformation as a result of the mobilization of people, places, words, and things. This course will examine how writers of the Romantic period responded to this new world in motion. Attention will be given to recent theoretical work on mobilities, with attention given to concerns such as travel, trade, empire, globalization, modernity, migration, tourism, translation, communication, and print culture.

Course Reading List:
Writers discussed will include Coleridge, Wordsworth, William Godwin, Mary Shelley, Clare, De Quincey, and Mary Prince.

Method of Evaluation and Course Requirements:
Research Paper (40%), In-class Presentation (20%), Book Review (20%), Blackboard Participation (10%), Class Participation (10%)

Term: F-Term (Fall Term: September - December 2015)
Date/Time:  Wednesday,  9:00am - 11:00am, 2 hours
Location:  Room
JHB 616 (Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street)

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ENG4664HS
Romantic Pastoral Revisited
K. Weisman

Course Description:

Pastoral has long been a subject close to the centre of studies of British Romanticism. It has been absorbed into all of the major theoretical debates: from linguistic theories studying it as a forum for textual displacement, to historicist readings of pastoral that study its mediations of history and commodity culture, and more recently to eco-criticisms that read pastoral in terms of the economy of ecological and global considerations. Pastoral, and the georgic pastoral, have always been indispensable value terms in our understanding of the period. And yet pastoral, for all of its vital importance, is a term that still causes confusion, or that is sometimes used as a casual synonym for “landscape.” This course will study the old subject of Romantic pastoral anew. We will study its variable definitions, the lively debates, both historical and contemporary, surrounding it, and the many crucial points of contact it makes with key issues in Romantic poetry. These include its inextricable relationship with elegy and other genres, and the central place played by pastoral in Romantic political, philosophical and social culture.

Course Reading List:
Primary Reading:

Readings will include selections from such historical sources as Virgil, Theocritus, Spenser, Sidney, Milton, Pope, Addison and others. Primary reading in poetry will be drawn from such authors as Charlotte Smith, William Wordsworh, Ann Yearsley, John Clare, P.B. Shelly, Letitia Landon, and Matthew Arnold.

Method of Evaluation and Course Requirements:
Oral book report 15%; seminar presentation 25%; class participation 15%; final research paper 45%

Term:  S-Term (Spring Term: January - April 2016)
Date/Time:  Wednesday,  1:00pm - 3:00pm,  2 hours
Location:  Room
JHB 617 (Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street)

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ENG4741HF
Victorian Lyric
D. Wright

Course Description:

This course is intended as an intensive survey of the lyric poetry of the Victorian period, and also an introduction to the theory of the lyric (Victorian or otherwise) from the nineteenth century to the present. As we work through this poetic canon, we’ll pursue several broad questions: In a historical period dominated by the long serialized novel, how does lyric persist, and why? How do Victorian lyric poets imagine and construct the literary history of lyric that precedes them, from the enormous influence of Sappho to the more direct influence of the Romantic poets? We’ll find that while Victorian poets took part in this lyric tradition, they also reimagined and reshaped it, mounting a critique of the fundamental assumptions of the genre: assumptions about the transparency of the self to others; about the communication of affective and contemplative experience; about the individual and her embeddedness in, or disconnection from, a social world; about moral virtues such as sincerity, authenticity, consistency, and self-examination; and about sexuality, erotic life, and the expressiveness of the body.

Course Reading List:
Readings: A wide selection of poetry by Alfred Tennyson, Robert Browning, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Matthew Arnold, Christina Rossetti, D. G. Rossetti, A. C. Swinburne, George Eliot, James Thomson, Gerard Manley Hopkins, Charles Baudelaire, Arthur Rimbaud, W. B. Yeats, Oscar Wilde, Amy Levy, Michael Field, A. E. Housman, and Thomas Hardy.
 
Theory and criticism to be selected from among pieces by A. H. Hallam, John Stuart Mill, Robert Browning, Matthew Arnold, John Ruskin, Walter Pater, A. C. Swinburne, Oscar Wilde, Alice Meynell, Lionel Trilling, Paul de Man, Barbara Johnson, Martin Heidegger, Jonathan Culler, Herbert Tucker, Isobel Armstrong, J. Hillis Miller, Yopie Prins, Angela Leighton, Cornelia Pearsall, Erik Gray, Jason Rudy, Meredith Martin.

Method of Evaluation and Course Requirements:
Presentation 15%; paper proposal 15%; article-length paper 50%; participation 20%.

Term:  F-Term (Fall Term: September - December 2015)
Date/Time:  Tuesday,  9:00am - 11:00am,  2 hours
Location:
  Room JHB 718 (Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street)

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ENG4879HF
Christianity in Victorian Literature
M. Knight

Course Description:
Although it is widely acknowledged that Christianity played a major role in the Victorian period, it can be more difficult for literary critics to think insightfully about the grammar of faith. Difficulties can include a lack of familiarity with the basic contours of the Christian faith, confusion regarding the extent and meaning of the period's theological differences, and the broader absence of an interdisciplinary vocabulary appropriate to talking about religion and literature. More specifically, the subject of Christianity in Victorian Literature raises a host of challenging questions. Was Christianity opposed to the imagination or a basis for literary creativity? Could religious doctrines be translated into literary forms without a loss of theological content? How were religious concerns caught up with other debates such as those regarding nationality and gender? Was literary criticism of the established church a sign of godlessness or an attempt to reform Christianity from within? And to what extent was Matthew Arnold right in thinking that religion and culture shared a common aim? These questions and others will be addressed in a course that examines the interaction between Christianity and literature in the Victorian period.

Course Requirements:
While the course will draw broadly on a range of nineteenth-century writing (including theology) and contemporary criticism and theory, the main focus of our discussions will be the work of six literary figures from the period. These might include Charles Dickens, Christina Rossetti, George MacDonald, George Eliot, Matthew Arnold, and Alice Meynell.

Method of Evaluation:
Seminar Presentation and Related Short Paper (30%), Informed Participation (20%), Final Research Paper (50%).

Term:  F-Term (Fall Term: September - December 2015)
Date/Time:  Thursday, 11:00am - 1:00pm,  2 hours
Location:
  Room JHB 614 (Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street)

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ENG4884HF
Nineteenth-Century Fiction & the Discovery of Everyday Life
A. Jaffe

Course Description:

When and why did the ordinary become so strange that it had to be discovered? When did the lower classes become, to borrow Thomas Hardy’s term, obscure? We will take up Henri Lefebvre’s contention that everyday life emerged as a new concept for criticism and reflection in the nineteenth century, and will engage these and other questions about the discovery and invention of the everyday in the novel during this period. Such topics as temporality, seriality, rituals and routines; boredom, habit, and desire will be part of our discussion of this field as it emerged in the 19th century and has been theorized in the 20th and 21st.

Reading List:
Readings by (provisionally) Austen, Eliot, Trollope, Mayhew; theoretical work by Freud, Lefebvre, DeCerteau, Bourdieu, Moretti and others.

Method of Evaluation and Course Requirements:
Participation 20%; presentation 20%; Paper 60%.

Term: F -Term (Fall Term: September - December 2015)
Date/Time:  Monday,  1:00pm - 3:00pm,  2 hours
Location:
  Room JHB 718 (Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street)

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