Department of English

University of Toronto

5000 Level Courses

ENG5051HS
Energy and Economy in the American Renaissance
A. Ackerman

Course Description:

This seminar will center on Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass and Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick and the energy sources that are their governing tropes: electricity and oil. Emerson’s essays will provide a language of energy, power, commodity, and renewal, as will Frederick Douglass’s Narrative, and Thoreau will enable us to reconceptualise the meaning of “economy” in Walden. We will read these authors in relation to ecological and economic thinking of their period and ours, along with authors such as Coleridge, Carlisle and Marx. Drawing on the field of ecocritism, the course aims to examine F. O. Matthiessen’s seminal work American Renaissance in a new context that is shaping human relations to the material world. America Renaissance writers constituted what many today regard as a proto-ecopoetics, and we will examine the representational strategies and sociopolitical commitments that may be said to characterize this practice.

Course Reading List:
Primary Texts: Whitman, Leaves of Grass; Melville, Moby-Dick, stories (e.g., “Bartleby,” “Lightning-Rod Man,” “The Paradise of Bachelors and the Tartarus of Maids,” etc.); Emerson, essays (e.g., “Self-Reliance,” “American Civilization,” etc.); Thoreau, Walden; Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass.
 
Secondary Texts: F. O. Matthiessen, American Renaissance; Carolyn Porter, “Reification and American Literature;” William Cronin, Uncommon Ground: Rethinking the Human Place in Nature; Lawrence Buell, The Environmental Imagination: Thoreau, Nature Writing, and the Formation of American Culture; Jane Bennett, Vibrant Matter: A Political Ecology of Things; Paul Gilmore, Aesthetic Materialism: Electricity and American Romanticism.

Method of Evaluation and Course Requirements:
Seminar discussion: Informed participation (20%).  One-page responses on Blackboard (20%).  Presentations (20%). Research Essay (40%).

Term: S -Term (Spring Term: January - April 2016)
Date/Time:  Wednesday,  9:00am - 11:00am,  2 hours
Location:  Room
JHB 718 (Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street)

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ENG5200HF (Cancelled)
Woolf/Beckett/Coetzee
J. Gang

ENG5279HS
Class and Community in Postwar American Literature
N. Dolan

Course Description:

Marxist theory posits a binary class structure rooted in an inevitable progressive conflict between bourgeois and proletariat. But more complex, many-layered, indeterminate, and unstable patterns of stratification emerged in American society in the aftermath of WWII. These included a significant amount of upward mobility for white ethnics and women, the slow emergence of a black middle class, and the apparently diminishing importance of class-based communal affiliations and identifications for suburbanite consumers with ready access to advanced technology of communication and transportation. This course looks at a range of postwar American literature with an eye towards what it discloses about social class in this period. It also draws on literary and sociological theory as well as empirical sociological studies to illuminate the literature.

Course Reading List:
Authors to be considered may include: Jack Kerouac, Raymond Carver, Tillie Olson, Rita Dove, Flannery O'Connor, John Cheever, Bernard Malamud, Philip Roth, Joan Didion, John Updike, Richard Rodriquez, Junot Diaz, Vladimir Nabokov, Joyce Carol Oates, Nathaniel West, Andre Dubus, Russell Banks, Jhumpa Lahiri

Method of Evaluation and Course Requirements:
In the first four weeks we will establish a set of shared conceptual reference points by recourse to: (1) Rhonda Levine’s Social Class and Stratification (2006) – a useful selection of major statements on social class from Marx to the present, including Weber, American stratification theorists, Frank Parkin, and Erik Olin Wright; (2) substantial selections from Pierre Bourdieu’s Distinction (1984); and (3) Annette Lareau’s and Dalton Conley’s Social Class: How Does it Work (2008). In all subsequent weeks the discussion will focus on a primary work of literature. Each week one or two students will also make brief ten-to-fifteen-minute presentations on a work of history, literary theory, or practical criticism relevant to the topic of social class (20%). (A secondary bibliography will be provided). At the end of the semester one 20-25 pp. term paper will be required, which must draw upon one work of history, one work of literary theory, one work of sociological theory, and at least one work of previous critical commentary on the specific literary work(s) or author(s) in question (80%).

Term: S -Term (Spring Term: January - April 2016)
Date/Time:  Thursday,  6:00pm - 9:00pm,  3 hours
Location:  Room
JHB 614 (Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street)

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ENG5580HF
American Pastoral: Agriculture and Environment in American Literature

A. Most

NOTE:  Due to the holiday of Rosh Hashanah, ENG5580 will NOT meet on Tuesday, September 15. The first class will meet on Tuesday, September 22. There will be a makeup class immediately following the end of term on Thursday, December 10 from 1-3pm in the same classroom JHB 718.

Course Description
American Pastoral will explore how American writers have imagined and represented the human relationship to non-human nature over the course of more than two centuries. We will read canonical works of American environmental literature as well as key works of eco-criticism in light of twenty-first century environmental realities, analyzing the relationship between narrative and environment in order to build a compelling set of literary approaches equal to the urgent challenges of our contemporary moment.

Reading List:
(Some titles still subject to change)

Primary Texts: Bill McKibben, Eaarth; Henry D. Thoreau, Walden, Civil Disobedience and Other Writings; Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass; Willa Cather , My Antonia; Rachel Carson, Silent Spring; Wendell Berry, The Art of the Commonplace; Leslie Marmon Silko, Ceremony; Toni Morrison, Beloved; Philip Roth, The Counterlife; Cormac McCarthy, The Road; Michael Pollan, The Omnivore’s Dilemma; Dave Eggers, Zeitoun; plus selected poems and short essays.

Secondary Texts: Selections from the work of Raymond Williams, Leo Marx, Lawrence Buell, William Cronon, Greg Garrard, Annette Kolodny, Jonathan Bate, Paul Outka, Stacey Alaimo, Ursula Heise, Timothy Morton, Rebecca Solnit and Elizabeth Kolbert.

Method of Evaluation and Course Requirements: 
Class Participation 20%, Book Report 15%, Presentation 25%, Final Essay 40%.

Term: F -Term (Fall Term: September 22 - December 10, 2015) *1st class Tuesday, September 22; make-up class Thursday, December 10, 1-3pm, JHB 718.
Date/Time:  Tuesday,  1:00pm - 3:00pm,  2 hours
Location:  Room
JHB 718 (Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street)

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ENG5731HS
Transitional Justice and Indigenous Writing in Canada
C. Suzack

Course Description:

Transitional justice represents a legal and political paradigm that examines the social justice goals of adversely-affected communities. Taking as their object of analysis the “justice gap” that exists as a consequence of the breakdown in a community’s social order, transitional justice paradigms focus on periods of reform within countries that have suffered massive human rights abuses in order to provide mechanisms that address the “rights of victims, build civic trust, and establish and strengthen democratic law practices” (ICTJ, “What is Transitional Justice?”).

In this course we will explore how transitional justice paradigms apply to Indigenous communities in Canada. We will examine literary texts in order to scrutinize the social justice issues that Indigenous authors raise and consider the “justice gap” that exists in using literary texts to explore social justice issues. As human rights scholar Julie Mertus explains, “Most survivors … do not see themselves in the work of judicial processes … There is no crime of destruction of souls, deprivation of childhood, erasure of dreams.” Our objectives will be to ask how literary texts further the goals of social justice practices and to analyze how literary expression contributes to our understanding concerning the justice issues that Indigenous community’s experience.

Course Reading List:
a) Charles Altieri, The Particulars of Rapture: An Aesthetics of the Affects. Ithaca: Cornell UP, 2003.
b) Ruti Teitel, Transitional Justice. Oxford and New York: Oxford UP, 2002. (selections)
c) Julie Mertus, “Truth in a Box: The Limits of Justice through Judicial Mechanisms.” The Politics of Memory: Truth, Healing & Social Justice. Ed. Ifi Amadiume & Abdullahi An-Na’im. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 2000.
d) Paige Arthur. “How ‘Transitions’ Reshaped Human Rights: A Conceptual History of Transitional Justice.” Human Rights Quarterly 31 (2009): 321-367.
e) Highway, Tomson. Kiss of the Fur Queen, 1998.
f) Housty, William. “NEB on Heiltsuk Culture, Threat of Oil Spill.” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4UOouXAwmPE, 2012.
g) Johnston, Basil. Indian School Days, 1988.
h) Courtney Jung, “Canada and the Legacy of the Indian Residential Schools: Transitional Justice for Indigenous People in a Nontransitional Society.” Identities in Transition: Challenges for Transitional Justice in Divided Societies. Ed. Paige Arthur. Cambridge University Press, 2013. 217-250.
i) Chrystos, Not Vanishing. Vancouver: Press Gang, 1988.
j) Louise Halfe, Bear Bones & Feathers. Regina: Coteau, 1994.

Method of Evaluation and Course Requirements:
Position Papers 40%
Research Essay 40%
Participation 20%

Term: S -Term (Spring Term: January - April 2016)
Date/Time:  Tuesday,  3:00pm - 6:00pm,  3 hours
Location:  Room
JHB 614 (Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street)

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ENG5744HF
1967: A Year in Canadian Letters
N. Mount

Course Description:

This course attempts to recreate one year in the life of Canadian literature and literary culture. My choice of year isn’t entirely arbitrary: any year would satisfy the course’s methodological goals, but 1967 marks an especially energetic confluence of Canadian literature with Canadian nationalism, including the birthday party in Montreal, the founding of Talonbooks in Vancouver and the House of Anansi in Toronto, the writing of Dennis Lee’s Civil Elegies, the publication of bp Nichol’s first “book,” and the international explosion of Marshall McLuhan. Because no national literature, least of all Canadian, develops in isolation, we’ll also read a selection of non-Canadian works that Canadians were reading and talking about that year, like Desmond Morris’s The Naked Ape, Angela Carter’s The Magic Toyshop, and Richard Brautigan’s Trout Fishing in America.

Course Reading List:
Tentatively: Northrop Frye, The Modern Century; Desmond Morris, The Naked Ape; Margaret Atwood, The Circle Game; Dennis Lee, Civil Elegies; W. S. Merwin, The Lice; Richard Brautigan, Trout Fishing in America; George Bowering, Baseball: A Poem in the Magic Number 9; Austin Clarke, The Meeting Point; V.S. Naipaul, The Mimic Men; Angela Carter, The Magic Toyshop; Atwood, The Edible Woman; Timothy Findley, The Last of the Crazy People; Ira Levin, Rosemary’s Baby; Marshall McLuhan, The Medium is the Massage; bp Nichol, Journeying and the Returns; Al Purdy, North of Summer; Audrey Thomas, Ten Green Bottles; Alden Nowlan, Bread, Wine and Salt.

Method of Evaluation and Course Requirements:
Course marks will be determined by seminar participation, including short written weekly responses (40%), and a 5,000-word research paper (60%).

Term: F -Term (Fall Term: September - December 2015)
Date/Time:  Thursday,  1:00pm - 3:00pm,  2 hours
Location:  Room
JHB 718 (Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street)

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ENG5801HS (Cancelled)
Kinship in Indigenous and Asian Canadian Literatures
S. Kamboureli

ENG5851HF
Faulkner and the American South
M. Cobb

Course Description:
Quite famously, William Faulkner had a formal desire: "I'm trying to say it all in one sentence, between one Cap and one period." Certainly he tried, although his punctuation feels more often like an exclamation point than a period. And it's this emphatic, furious formalism that will be our focus as we distinguish Faulkner's modernism from the more typically Southern Gothic features of other writers of Southern U.S. Literature. We will start with four of William Faulkner's novels—The Sound and the Fury, As I Lay Dying, Light in August, and Absalom, Absalom! And then we'll read three other pieces of literature about the American South: Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; Flannery O'Connor's Wise Blood; and Tennessee Williams' A Streetcar Named Desire. We'll be concerned with the dominant themes that animate professional and amateur readings of Southern literature: slavery; race; class; gender; violence; regionalism; agrarian economics; the shadow effects of Northern industrialization; the Great Migration; incest; sexuality; religion; the legacies of the Civil war; and so forth. But we're going to be especially attentive to the manner in which Faulkner created a livid modernist poetics to articulate these themes, and how these expressive strategies contrast with other major writings and representations of the South.

Course Reading List:
The Sound and the Fury, William Faulkner
As I Lay Dying, William Faulkner
Light in August, William Faulkner
Absalom, Absalom!, William Faulkner
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain
Wise Blood, Flannery O'Connor
A Streetcar Named Desire, Tennessee Williams

Method of Evaluation and Course Requirements:
Active, lively seminar participation, with the hope of learning skills geared toward contributing to an intellectual community and conversation beyond the seminar room (20%). One conference paper-style class presentation on one of the assigned pieces of literature or "theory" (35%). One fifteen to twenty-page research paper, clearly demonstrating the following: a) knowledge of a field of primary and secondary sources; b) the intellectual questions that make the writing of the paper necessary; c) writing and argumentation that has publishable promise (45%).

Term: F-Term (Fall Term: September - December 2015)
Date/Time:  Monday,  11:00am - 1:00pm,  2 hours
Location: Room UC 257 (University College, 15 King's College Circle)

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ENG5854HS
The Global South
D. Cruz

Course Description:

Literary scholarship has been invigorated by what has been called the transnational and hemispheric turn, a mode of scholarship that questions the primacy of the nation-state even as it recognizes continued forms of domination and oppression. Resisting easy binaries of resistance or complicit acceptance, hemispheric critical geographies instead examine what Caroline Levander and Walter Mignolo have called “re-existence,” as they theorize alternate modalities of existence, community formation, and cultural production. In this seminar, we will examine one model of hemispheric analysis: the Global South. Our first objective will be to meditate upon a series of questions that connect studies of the Global South to critical histories, aesthetics, and authorial practices in the study of twentieth century and contemporary literature: How have authors imagined the Global South, and how have these spaces functioned historically and geopolitically? How do authors reframe these spaces, often associated with a long history of violence and oppression, as offering possibilities that disrupt normative definitions of race, gender, and sex? Along the way, we’ll examine the complexities of these sites and communities. Our second objective will be to analyze the Global South as linked to form, aesthetics, and genre. We’ll build upon a rich history of scholarship that explores the vexed relationship between literary aesthetics; the representation of race, class, gender, and sexuality; and empire, globalization, and diaspora (to name just a few). In addition to work explicitly tied to the global south, we’ll also read criticism in new Southern studies, rural studies, gender and sexuality studies, and transnational American Studies.

Course Reading List:
Primary (subject to revision): Kate Chopin, The Awakening; Ana Castillo, So Far From God; Junot Diaz, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, William Faulkner, The Sound and the Fury; Toni Morrison, A Mercy; Leslie Marmon Silko, Garden in the Dunes; Monique Truong, Bitter in the Mouth; Jesmyn Ward, Salvage the Bones; Alex Gilvarry, From the Memoirs of a Non-Enemy Combatant.

Secondary and Theoretical Texts (subject to revision): Gloria Anzaldúa, Borderlands/La Frontera (selections); Houston Baker and Dana Nelson, eds. “Violence, the Body and the South,” Special issue of American Literature; Leslie Bow, Partly Colored: Asian Americans and Racial Anomaly in the Segregated South; Kandice Chuh, “Of Hemispheres and Other Spheres: Navigating Karen Tei Yamashita’s Literary World”; Deborah Cohn and Jon Smith, eds., Look Away! The U.S. South in New World Studies; Joyce Dyer,“Reading The Awakening with Toni Morrison”; Thadious Davis, Southscapes: Geographies of Race, Region, and Literature; Scott Herring, Another Country: Queer Anti-Urbanism; Sheri Huyndorff, The Transnational Politics of Contemporary Native Culture; Suzanne Jones and Sharon Monteith, eds, South to a New Place; Khyati Y. Joshi and Jigna Desai, eds. Asian Americans in Dixie: Race and Migration in the South; Caroline Field Levander and Walter Mignolo, “The Global South and World Dis/Order”; Caroline Field Levander and Robert Levine, eds., Hemispheric American Studies; José David Saldívar, Trans-Americanity: Subaltern Modernitites, Global Coloniality, and the Cultures of Greater Mexico; Hortense Spillers, “Peter’s Pans: Eating in the Diaspora”; Melanie Benson Taylor, Reconstructing the Native South: American Indian Literature and the Lost Cause; Eudora Welty, “Place in Fiction”; Patricia Yaeger, “Ghosts and Shattered Bodies; or, What does it mean to still be haunted by Southern Literature?” and Dirt and Desire: Reconstructing Southern Women's Writing, 1930-1990.

Method of Evaluation and Course Requirements:
Paper proposal and annotated bibliography (10%), Presentation (10%), Participation (20%), Research Paper (60%)

Term: S -Term (Spring Term: January - April 2016)
Date/Time:  Tuesday,  9:00am - 11:00am,  2 hours (NB: Day & Time Change)
Location:  Room
JHB 718 (Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street)

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ENG5872HS
The Victorian Novel, Literally
C. Schmitt

Course Description:
This is a course with two foci, one theoretical and the other literary-historical. Theoretically: we will canvas recent work on the surface, the literal, and the denotative. In what might be called the literal turn, long-dominant reading practices that seek to articulate a text’s political unconscious, ideology, or non-dit are being abandoned or postponed in favour of interpretative strategies that attempt to grasp and construct meaning out of textual surfaces, givens, or denotations. Literary-historically: we will read a number of Victorian novels and novellas that, in their different ways, foreground the denotative aspects of fictionality; these texts will serve as case studies in the possibility or impossibility, productivity or lack thereof, of critical approaches that refuse or defer the moment of "deep" (paranoid, figural, ideological) reading in hopes of dwelling in the superficial or the literal.

Course Reading list:
Criticism/theory (for a start):
Elaine Freedgood, from The Ideas in Things; Margaret Cohen, from The Novel and the Sea; Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, "Reparative Reading"; Stephen Best and Sharon Marcus, "Surface Reading: An Introduction"; Sharon Marcus, from Between Women; Elaine Freedgood and Cannon Schmitt, "Denotatively, Literally, Technically”; Roland Barthes, from The Preparation of the Novel.
Fiction: by Joseph Conrad, Charles Dickens, George Eliot, Elizabeth Gaskell, George Gissing, Robert Louis Stevenson, and others.

Method of Evaluation and Course Requirements:
Informed participation (10%), presentation (10%), short close reading (15%), final paper proposal (15%), seminar paper (50%).

Term: S -Term (Spring Term: January - April 2016)
Date/Time:  day,  11:00am - 1:00pm,  2 hours
Location:  Room
JHB 614 (Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street)

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ENG5901HF
New World African Literature
G.E. Clarke


Course Description:
One of the world's most vibrant diasporic literatures, 'black' writing from Canada, the Caribbean, and the United States stands at the crux of issues of slavery versus liberty, modernity versus 'primitivism,' political consciousness versus 'art-for-art's-sake,' and the matter of orality (music) versus text. We will explore these questions via readings of critics like Du Bois, Fanon, Gates, and Gilroy and readings of writers like Morrison, A. Clarke, X, Obama, and Walcott.

Course Reading List:
We may read selections from Austin Clarke, M. NourbeSe Philip, D. Laferriere, D. Walcott, E.K. Braithwaite, F. Fanon, B. Obama, T. Morrison.

Method of Evaluation and Course Requirements:

Seminar presentation: 30%
Research paper: 50%
Participation: 20%

Term: F-Term (Fall Term: September - December 2015) 
Date/Time:  Tuesday,  6:00pm - 8:00pm,  2 hours
Location:  Room
 UC 248 (University College, 15 King's College Circle)

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JLE5116HS
Naming the World: Realism Travels the Globe
N. ten Kortenaar

Course Description:
When they first encountered novelistic realism, writers all over the world felt it constituted an invitation to include in their writing distinctly non-literary elements of their own world in the form of descriptions and names of things and places. Realism encouraged a new kind of vision: writing about things that had never been written about in order to make people see those things for the first time. We will examine the meaning realism acquired as it made its way around the world by looking at three Western texts to suggest the history of realism—a novel by Balzac, another by Zola, and a third by Updike—and then at six more realist novels from other traditions, that is, from Africa, India, China, and Latin America. We will also look at representative theory of realism by Auerbach, Lukacs, Barthes, Ermarth, Jameson, etc.

New Course Reading List:
We will look at three Western texts to suggest the history of realism: a novel by Balzac, another by Zola, and a third by John Updike. Then we will consider six more novels from other novel traditions: for example, From India: Mulk Raj Anand, Anita Desai, and Amit Chaudhuri From Africa: Bernardo Honwana, Nadine Gordimer, Sembène Ousmane, Alex LaGuma From China: Shen Congwen From Latin America: Roberto Bolano We will also look at representative theory of realism by Auerbach, Lukacs, Barthes, Ermarth, Jameson, etc.

Method of Evaluation and Course Requirements:
Class Participation: 20% (including weekly preparation); Seminar: 10%; Essays: 70%
Option 1:
First Essay (3000 words: due Mar): 35%
Second Essay on different topic (3000 words: due April): 35%
Option 2:
 First Essay (3000 words: due Mar): 20%
Second Essay building on first (6000 words: due April): 50%
Option 3:
Essay (6000 words: due April): 70%

Term: S-Term (Spring Term: January - April 2016)
Date/Time:  Wednesday,  3:00pm - 5:00pm,  2 hours
Location:  Room
BT319 (the Linda Hutcheon Seminar Room at the Centre for Comparative Literature, Isabel Bader Theatre - 93 Charles St. West)

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Return to Graduate Courses main page. ENG5744HF
1967: A Year in Canadian Letters
N. Mount

Course Description:
This course attempts to recreate one year in the life of Canadian literature and literary culture. My choice of year isn’t entirely arbitrary: any year would satisfy the course’s methodological goals, but 1967 marks an especially energetic confluence of Canadian literature with Canadian nationalism, including the birthday party in Montreal, the founding of Talonbooks in Vancouver and the House of Anansi in Toronto, the writing of Dennis Lee’s Civil Elegies, the publication of bp Nichol’s first “book,” and the international explosion of Marshall McLuhan. Because no national literature, least of all Canadian, develops in isolation, we’ll also read a selection of non-Canadian works that Canadians were reading and talking about that year, like Desmond Morris’s The Naked Ape, Angela Carter’s The Magic Toyshop, and Richard Brautigan’s Trout Fishing in America.

Course Reading List:
Tentatively: Northrop Frye, The Modern Century; Desmond Morris, The Naked Ape; Margaret Atwood, The Circle Game; Dennis Lee, Civil Elegies; W. S. Merwin, The Lice; Richard Brautigan, Trout Fishing in America; George Bowering, Baseball: A Poem in the Magic Number 9; Austin Clarke, The Meeting Point; V.S. Naipaul, The Mimic Men; Angela Carter, The Magic Toyshop; Atwood, The Edible Woman; Timothy Findley, The Last of the Crazy People; Ira Levin, Rosemary’s Baby; Marshall McLuhan, The Medium is the Massage; bp Nichol, Journeying and the Returns; Al Purdy, North of Summer; Audrey Thomas, Ten Green Bottles; Alden Nowlan, Bread, Wine and Salt.

Method of Evaluation and Course Requirements:
Course marks will be determined by seminar participation, including short written weekly responses (40%), and a 5,000-word research paper (60%).

Term: F -Term (Fall Term: September - December 2015)
Date/Time: Thursday, 1:00pm - 3:00pm, 2 hours
Location: Room JHB 718 (Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street)

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