Department of English

University of Toronto

2016 Summer Courses

2016 Summer Graduate Course Timetable & Course Descriptions*

*NOTE: Room locations are TBA. Course schedule & course information may be subject to change

Time Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
10am -12noon

ENG6066HF 

Style: Authorial Signature in the Age of Cyber Technology

U. Esonwanne

Room JHB 616** 

2 hours

*No class on Victoria Day, May 23

ENG6066HF 

Style: Authorial Signature in the Age of Cyber Technology 

U. Esonwanne

Room JHB 616** 

2 hours

11am -1pm          
12noon -2pm  

ENG4801HF

Aging and Older Age in the Nineteenth-Century British Novel

A. Charise

Room JHB 616**

2 hours

 

ENG4801HF

Aging and Older Age in the Nineteenth-Century British Novel

A. Charise

Room JHB 616**

2 hours

 
12noon -3pm

ENG5785HF

Alice Munro and the Possibilities of the Short Story

M. Levene

Room JHB 718

3 hours

*No class on Victoria Day, May 23

ENG5785HF

Alice Munro and the Possibilities of the Short Story

M. Levene

Room JHB 718

3 hours

1pm  -3pm
3pm -6pm  

ENG5963HF

James Joyce: Modernism, Modernity, Mythology

G. Leonard

Room JHB 616**

3 hours

*No classes June 14 & 16, last class June 23.

 

ENG5963HF

James Joyce: Modernism, Modernity, Mythology

G. Leonard

Room JHB 616**

3 hours

*No classes June 14 & 16, last class June 23.

 

TIMETABLE NOTES:

**CLASSES IN ROOM JHB 616 MAY BE RELOCATED TO ANOTHER ROOM IN THE JHB FOR DEPARTMENTAL BUSINESS.

ENG4801HF Aging and Older Age in the Nineteenth-Century British Novel, A. Charise: First class May 10. Last class June 16.

ENG5785HF Alice Munro and the Possibilities of the Short Story, M. Levene: First class May 9.  There will be no class on Victoria Day, May 23.  Classes resume May 25, and last class June 20.

ENG5963HF James Joyce: Modernism, Modernity, Mythology, G. Leonard: First class May 10.  There will be no classes on June 14 or 16.  Classes resume June 21, and last class June 23.

ENG6066HF Style: Authorial Signature in the Age of Cyber Technology, U. Esonwanne: First class May 9.  There will be no class on Victoria Day. May 23.  Classes resume May 25, and last class June 20. 


2016 Summer Graduate Course Descriptions

 

ENG4801HF
Aging and Older Age in the Nineteenth-Century British Novel
A Charise

Course Description:
This course focuses on age, and older age especially, as an analytical category of particular significance to the nineteenth-century British novel. From juvenescent protagonists to marriage plots to the Bildungsroman, nineteenth-century writing typically posits youth as its default subject and perspective. However, in response to major upheavals in medical, philosophical, and economic understandings of human aging, nineteenth-century British literature also contributed important strategies for representing what old age was—or what it might be—in the context of longer lifespans lived not only by individuals but by populations as well. We will explore how prominent British writers employed the imaginative resources of literature to shape, witness, and represent “the invention of the elderly subject” (to use Karen Chase’s recent formulation). With reference to genres including the gothic, realism, and science fiction, we will pay close attention to the ways in which aging and older age complicate or even confound traditional plots of growth and development—for individuals, societies, and the long literary (after)lives of authors themselves. Although our readings will focus on texts of the British nineteenth century, this course is also intended to serve as a more general introduction to the emergent field of age studies.

Course Reading List:
Literary texts will include Godwin, St Leon: A Tale of the Sixteenth Century; Shelley, Matilda; Austen, Persuasion; Gaskell, Cranford; Eliot, Theophrastus Such; Trollope, The Warden, The Fixed Period; Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray; Shaw, Mrs Warren’s Profession; Wells, The Time Machine. With additional selections from: Rousseau, Burke, Wollstonecraft, Malthus; poetry by Blake, Coleridge, Wordsworth, Shelley, Landor, Arnold. Theoretical texts will include selections from: Ottaway, The Decline of Life; Cole, The Journey of Life; Beer, Darwin’s Plots; Small, The Long Life; Looser, Women Writers and Old Age in Great Britain, 1750-1850; Woodward, Figuring Age; Edelman, No Future; Bakhtin, The Dialogic Imagination; Ricoeur, Time and Narrative; Dames, The Physiology of the Novel; Cohen, Embodied.

Course Method of Evaluation and Course Requirements:
Includes brief seminar presentation (methodological/theoretical) (20%), participation (10%), in-class conference paper and response (20%), final research paper (50%).

Summer F Term:  Days/Times: Tuesday/Thursday 12:00 noon - 2:00 pm  (First class May 10. Last class June 16.)

Room: JHB 616**, Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George St.

2 Hours

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ENG5785HF
Alice Munro and the Possibilities of the Short Story
M. Levene

Course Description:
When asked about the recurrence of adultery and “sex without guilt” in her stories, Munro—without a trace of disingenuousness—explained that she found these subjects “interesting.” This seminar will explore her work because it is “interesting” in the deep manner in which Shakespeare and Joyce are interesting. An implication of this word is that our discussions will have no set ideological or methodological prism. They will centre on close readings of entire volumes (supplemented by other stories from the body of her work) with a view to the possibilities she creates in the short story form, among them the layering of stories within stories, transformed “epiphanies,” narrative pauses, and ontological parentheses. Where possible, the seminar will focus as well on ties between Munro’s fiction and stories by Chekhov, Joyce, Trevor, O’Connor, Gallant, Carver, Davis.

Course Reading List:
Primary Reading: Lives of Girls and Women, The Moons of Jupiter, The Progress of Love, Open Secrets, The Love of a Good Woman, Too Much Happiness. The Bob Miller Bookroom has the material for the course.

Course Method of Evaluation and Course Requirements:
Students will be responsible for at least one presentation that will be re-worked and submitted (together 20%). Regular participation is expected (20% of the grade). A final research paper (25 pages and 60%) is due about two weeks before the end of term. All papers are to be submitted by hand, not as e-mail attachments.

Summer F Term:  Days/Times: Monday/Wednesday 12:00 noon - 3:00 pm (First Class May 9. There will be no class on Victoria Day, May 23. Classes resume May 25, and last class June 20.) 

Room: JHB 718, Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George St.

3 Hours

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ENG5963HF
James Joyce: Modernism, Modernity, Mythology
G. Leonard

Course Description:
Joyce's biographer, Richard Ellmann, once remarked "we are still learning to be Joyce's contemporaries." It's an observation Joyce might well have been pleased to hear if we judge from this note he sent to his publisher in an effort to get his first work, Dubliners, published: "I seriously believe that you will retard the course of civilisation in Ireland by, preventing the Irish people from having one good look at themselves in my nicely polished looking-glass." A character in Ulysses remarks, "Shakespeare is the happy hunting ground of all minds that have lost their balance". In a similar manner, Joyce's fiction has been the happy hunting ground of literary critics and theorists seeking to maintain their balance. No literary theory of the past 50 years has failed to touch down at some point on Joyce's work. As a result it is sometimes difficult to approach the fiction as something other than a paradigm of any number of methodologies. This seminar will not entirely avoid that fate, and student seminar presentations/discussions will be designed to interrogate the strengths and weaknesses of various approaches, and yet our primary question will be what did Joyce think he was doing in writing these stories and novels, and what does he appear to have accomplished in doing so? Orienting one's reading of a text through authorial intention has always been a problematic approach to say the least, and yet Joyce went out of his way, time and time again, to present himself as someone on a mission, someone who must not be stopped unless we seek "to retard the course of civilisation". His character Stephen Dedalus is no less messianic: "I go to encounter for the millionth time the reality of experience and to forge in the smithy of my soul the uncreated conscience of my race." Youthful hubris? Probably. But, given what Joyce accomplished, also pretty much on the mark. Accordingly, while we will encounter and review all the major approaches in this seminar, we will also maintain an interest throughout in "the reality of experience" Stephen set out to encounter, especially as it pertains to the formation of an aesthetic that would become modernism --an aesthetic forged, in large part, in the "smithy" of what we now call modernity. More specifically, this "smithy" included the rise of advertising and commodity culture, the birth of a new Art form (cinema), and the corresponding explosion of form and content in futurism, dadaism surrealism, and impressionism.

The texts for Dubliners, A Portrait of the Artist as a young Man and Ulysses will be ordered at the Bob Miller bookstore. A packet will be prepared with selections gleaned from the bibliography below.

Course Reading List:
BIBLIOGRAPHY
I. MODERNITY
Berman, Marshall. All that is solid melts into air: the experience of modernity. 1987.
Charney, Leo. Cinema and the invention of modern life.
Felski, Rita. The gender of modernity
Fornäs, Johan. Consuming media: communication, shopping and everyday life. 2007.
Gillespie, Michael Allen. The theological origins of modernity.
Gilroy, Paul. The Black Atlantic: Modernity and Double Consciousness, 1995.
Jameson, Fredric. A singular modernity: essay on the ontology of the present. 2002.
Misa, Thomas J. Modernity and Technology.
Smart, Barry. ¬Facing modernity: ambivalence, reflexivity and morality, 1999 ----------------

II. JAMES JOYCE
Attridge, Derek. The Cambridge companion to James Joyce
Ellmann, Richard. James Joyce (New York: Oxford University Press, 1959)
Herr, Cheryl. Joyce's Anatomy of Culture
Joyce, Stanislaus. My Brother's Keeper: James Joyce's Early Years
Kershner, R.B. Joyce, Bakhtin, and Popular Literature: Chronicles of Disorder
Leonard, Garry. Advertising and commodity culture in Joyce. ------------------. Reading Dubliners again: a Lacanian perspective
North, Michael. Reading 1922: A Return to the Scene of the Modern

III. MODERNISM:
Armstrong, Tim. Modernism: a cultural history
Caws, Mary Ann. Manifesto: a century of isms
Caughie, Pamela L. Disciplining Modernism.
Kolocoroni, Vassiliki. Modernism: an anthology of sources and documents
Levenson, Michael Harry. The Cambridge companion to modernism
Nicholls, Peter. Modernisms: a literary guide
Whitworth, Michael H. Modernism.

Course Method of Evaluation and Course Requirements:
10 % Participation (weekly two page position papers); 20% Twenty Minute Presentations followed by student-led discussion; 70% Final essay. 20 pages.

Summer F Term:  Days/Times: Tuesday/Thursday 3:00 pm-6:00 pm (First class May 10. There will be no classes on June 14 or 16. Classes resume June 21, and last class June 23.)

Room: JHB 616**, Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George St.

3 hours

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ENG6066HF
Style: Authorial Signature in the Age of Cyber Technology
U. Esonwanne

Course Description:
Literary scholars agree that criticism attends to how texts say what we say they do. This consensus held until the late 20th c., when preoccupation with the what came to the fore. Lately, alarm over the waning of interest in the how of criticism has prompted apocalyptic warnings that criticism risks extinction like “clog dancing” and the dodo. More importantly, it has also inspired the publication of primers on style. These alarms and primers offer us the opportunity to ask what is actually at stake in expressions of concern about style – the fate of criticism as a discipline or the disposition of texts to the worlds they refract? Why worry about style in an age when “theory” has rendered individuality, its most fundamental premise, suspect? We may agree with St. Augustine that “fine style” does not confer truth on things, but we still wonder what truth style might disclose about criticism in the post-human age. Is style just “the how” by which texts distinguish authors’ responses to life’s imperatives or the opacity by which dissidence interrogates hegemonic verities in behalf of counter-hegemonic alternatives? Such are the kinds of questions this course will address through readings of theoretical and cultural texts.

Course Reading List:
Coetzee, J.M. The Lives of Animals (1999). Eagleton, Terry. How to Read a Poem. Oxford: Blackwell, 2007. –––. How to Read Literature. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2014. Kundera, Milan. The Unbearable Lightness of Being (1984). Longinus. On Great Writing (On the Sublime). 1957. Rushdie, Salman. The Satanic Verses (2008). Said, Edward W. On Late Style: Music and Literature Against the Grain. New York: Pantheon Books, 2006. –––. Out of Place: A Memoir (2000). Satrapi, Marjane. The Complete Persepolis (2004).

Course Method of Evaluation and Course Requirements:
Evaluation Scheme: Seminar (30%); Mini–conference (20%); Research Essay (50%)

Summer F Term:  Days/Times: Monday/Wednesday 10:00 am - 12:00 noon (First class May 9. There will be no class on Victoria Day, May 23. Classes resume May 25, and last class June 20.) 

Room: JHB 616**, Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George St.

2 Hours

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