Department of English

University of Toronto

2015 Summer Courses



2015 SUMMER GRADUATE TIMETABLE:

Time Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday

9am-12noon

 

 

 

 (June 11 ONLY)ENG5991HF *** Postcolonial Tragedies: Theory, Literature, Criticism

A. Quayson
Room: JHB718
3 Hours

 

12noon-3pm

ENG5991HF***

Postcolonial Tragedies:
Theory, Literature,
Criticism

A. Quayson
Room: JHB718
3 Hours

ENG1093HF
The Medieval
Vernacular Book
A. Gillespie
Room: JHB 222 2.5 Hours

ENG1093HF*
The Medieval
Vernacular Book
A. Gillespie
Room: JHB 222
2.5 Hours

ENG5991HF *** Postcolonial Tragedies: Theory, Literature, Criticism

A. Quayson
Room: JHB718
3 Hours

3pm-6pm

ENG5524HF*

*Modernism, Modernity and the Crisis in Temporality

G. Leonard
Room: JHB616

3 Hours

 

ENG5524HF*

*Modernism, Modernity and the Crisis in Temporality
G. Leonard
Room: JHB616
3 Hours

 

 

4pm-6pm

ENG2280HF

Mimesis and Representationin the
Renaissance

J. Patrick
Room:
Birge-Carnegie Library, VC 20 2 Hours

ENG2280HF

Mimesis and Representation in the Renaissance 

 J. Patrick
Room: Birge-Carnegie Library, VC 20

2 Hours

 

TIMETABLE NOTES:

 

 

 

 




SUMMER 2015 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS:

ENG1093HF
The Medieval Vernacular Book
A. Gillespie

Course Description

In this course we will read some of the best-known non-Chaucerian texts in Middle English and examine the relationship between these texts and the medieval manuscripts in which they have survived. Further, we will consider the relationship between the literariness of literary works and the forms – especially, but not exclusively, the bibliographical forms – that effect their meaning. The course will serve as an introduction to Middle English literature, medieval codicology, and book history; it will also serve as an opportunity for students to engage with recent theoretical interventions in these fields (among these, the new formalism; historicism after historicism; queer theory and unhistoricism; political ecology and thing theory; new materialism; and the descriptive turn in literary studies). 

Course Requirements
Reading List

Reading will be provided in a course book. We will probably read all of, or extracts from, Ancrene Wisse, the Harley lyrics, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and Pearl, Mankind, the York plays, Langland’s Piers Plowman, the Book of Margery Kempe, Lydgate’s Complaint of the Black Knight, and Hoccleve’s Complaint and Dialogue and some introductory material on each of these. Students will be required to consult digital or facsimile images of at least one manuscript witness to each text and a few short essays on medieval manuscript production. We will also read some theoretical work( e.g. Maura Nolan on historicism; Michel Serres on quasi-objects).

The course assumes that students have a solid grounding in literary and critical theory and Middle English language. Students who do not feel confident about their familiarity with either are welcome, but they should contact Prof. Gillespie before the course begins, so that she can recommend some preparatory reading and translation exercises.

Method of Evaluation:
a 2-4 page response to some critical reading, worth 10%; a set of palaeographical and codicological exercises, worth 10%; a set of 1 page close reading exercises, worth 15%; an in-class presentation on one manuscript, worth 15%. The final paper for this course is worth 50%.

Term: Summer F-Term (May and June)
Date/Time: Wednesday/Thursday, 12noon - 2:30pm, 2.5 hours (First day of class: Wednesday May 13 / Last day of class: Thursday June 18.)

Location: Room JHB 222, Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George St. 


ENG2280HF
Mimesis and Representation in the Renaissance
J. Patrick


Course Description
This course will examine selected late renaissance and early modern texts from Montaigne to Defoe. The texts have been chosen to explore a problem in literary history and theory: the emergence of several different kinds of representation from within the traditional practices of literary imitation. Theoretical writing on literature will be selected from a broad chronological range (from Plato to Derrida); as well, current writing on the topic will be used to stimulate and guide discussion. The course will concentrate on some of the following topics: the iconoclastic controversy of the sixteenth century; the beginnings of the novel in prose narratives of the late renaissance; artistic perspective and the norms of representation; the rise of representative government; authority and representation; representation and revenge; allegory and representation; representation and gender; paradoxes of reflexivity—the representation of representation, ekphrasis, “mise en abîme” (etc.); narcissism and the origins of psychoanalysis as a theory of representation; literary character and the question of subjectivity.

Reading List
Some of the texts below will be taught mainly in selections:
Petrarch, “The Ascent of Mont Ventoux”; Montaigne, “On Practice”; “On Experience” Shakespeare, Hamlet; Cervantes, Don Quixote, Part One; Descartes, Discourse on the Method; Calvin, Institutes (sels.); Hobbes, Leviathan (chs, 16-19 only); Milton, Paradise Lost, Bks. 1-2, 4-5, 9; prologues to Bks. 3, 7; Marvell, political poetry; Behn, Oroonoko; Lafayette, La princesse de Clèves; assorted theoretical texts.

Method of Evaluation
Essay / Research Paper, due at the end of term; value 50%; Three short (4-5 pages) seminar presentations (10% each): value 30%; Participation: 20%.

Term: Summer F-Term (May and June) 
Date/Time: Tuesday/Thursday, 4pm - 6pm, 2 hours (First day of class: Tuesday May 12 / Last day of class: Thursday June 18.)
Location: Birge-Carnegie Library, VC 20


ENG5524HF
Modernism, Modernity and the Crisis in Temporality
G. Leonard

Course Description

My presentation of modernist writers from 1895 to 1937 will explore how Wilde, Conrad, Joyce, Woolf, Eliot, Stevens, Yeats and Rhys register the crisis brought on—both in psychological models of subjectivity and aesthetic models of representation—by the progressive disenchantment of the modern world (to use Weber’s phrase). Even as the mysteries of Religion yield to the calculations of Science, the lived experience of “time” becomes more and more strange. Joyce will design the “epiphany”; Woolf will devote enormous attention to “the moment”; Rhys will document the way the unbearable burden of “time,” separated from “meaning” drives the addictive behaviours so prevalent in modernity. Without eternal verities intersecting causal sequence, time becomes a burden. Woolf will also look for secular equivalencies of formerly transcendent potentialities: the bond between Septimus and Mrs. Dalloway, for example, flourishing in the most unlikely manner, despite Sir William Bradshaw’s corrosive scientific method of “conversion” and “proportion,” reducing “human nature” to just another kind of “rough beast.”. Eliot’s Tiresias, adrift in modern London, is a helpless witness, watching people burrow deeper and deeper into an imminent secularity that forever promises a satisfaction that never arrives. Finally, Jean Rhys’s remarkable 1937 novel Good Morning, Midnight seems to herald the arrival of Yeats’s “rough beast” in the form of a rapidly spreading fascism, one that brings on the midnight of World War II.

Course Requirements
Readings:

Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray; Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness; James Joyce, selections from Dubliners; Virgina Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway; T.S. Eliot, The Waste Land; Jean Rhys, Good Morning, Midnight.

Critical Works (from which Selections will be drawn):
Charles Taylor: Sources of the Self: The Making of the Modern Identity, A Secular Age; Couze Venn: Occidentalism: Modernity and Subjectivity (2000); Walter Mignolo: The Darker Side of Western Modernity: Global Futures, Decolonial Options. (2011); Fredric Jameson: A Singular Modernity: Essay on the Ontology of the Present (2002); Anthony Giddens: Modernity and Self-Identity (1991); Edward Said: Culture and Imperialism; Michael Gillespie: The Theological Origins of Modernity (2009); Marshall Berman: All That is Solid Melts into Air: The Experience of Modernity (1992); Maureen Perkins: The Reform of Time: Magic and Modernity (2001)

Essay Collections:
NowHere: Space, Time and Modernity (1994), ed. Roger Friedland; Myth and the Making of Modernity: The Problem of Grounding in Early Twentieth Century Literature (1998), eds. Michael Bell, Peter Poellner; Religions of Modernity: Relocating the Sacred to the Self and the Digital (2010), eds. Stef Aupers and Dick Houtman.

Method of Evaluation:
10 percent weekly response; 20 percent presentation; 70 percent final essay.

Term: Summer F-Term (May and June) 
Date/Time: Monday/Wednesday, 3pm-6pm, 3 hours  (First day of class:  Monday May 11 / Last day of class:  Monday June 22.  
** NOTE: No class on Victoria Day, Monday May 18th, but class re-scheduled for Monday, June 22.)  
Location: JHB 616, Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George St. 


ENG5991HF
Postcolonial Tragedies: Theory, Literature, Criticism
A. Quayson

Course Description:
This course will survey the debates on literary tragedy from a postcolonial perspective. Theories of tragedy from Aristotle, Hegel, AC Bradley, George Steiner, Martha Nussbaum and David Scott will be explored for viewpoints on tragedy, which will in their turn be tested against a number of literary texts in the postcolonial literary tradition. Works by Achebe, Soyinka, Marquez, Kincaid, Ondaatje, and Toni Morrison will be discussed.

Course Reading List:
Selections from Aristotle, Hegel, AC Bradley, George Steiner, Martha Nussbaum, and David Scott. Chinua Achebe, Arrow of God; Wole Soyinka, Death and the King's Horseman; Michael Ondaatje, The English Patient; Gabriel Garicia Marquez, One Hundred Years of Solitude; Junot Diaz, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao.

Course Method of Evaluation and Course Requirements:
Weekly response papers. Annotated bibliography End-of-term paper Presentations


Term: Summer F-Term (May and June)   
Date/Time: Tuesday/Friday 12noon-3pm, 3 hours (First day of class:  Tuesday May 12 / Last day of class: Friday June 19 ***
NOTE: There is no class on Friday, June 5th, but class re-scheduled for 9am-12noon, Thursday, June 11.)
Location: JHB 718, Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George St. 

 


 

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