Department of English

University of Toronto

Call For Papers

Note: For a comprehensive compilation of international CFPs, visit
UPENNs English CALL FOR PAPERS Archive.
NB: Included on this web-page are CFPs of particular interest to the
University of Toronto Department of English Faculty and/or students.



To submit information for posting, please write to Natasha Leghari, Program Assistant, Communications and Alumni Officer: natasha.leghari@utoronto.ca  


NB: The American Comparative Literature Association's 2021 Annual Meeting is set to take place April 8-11, 2020, in a fully virtual format.

Call for Proposals - Modernism and Other Exhaustions at ACLA 2021

Exhaustion is once again in vogue in the humanities. Earlier in 2020, ACLA seminars on "Decay Theory," "Despair," and "revolutionary exhaustion" proposed to map scholarly responses to affective, material, and ecological depletion under global late capital, resurgent nationalisms, and technological "progress." Reflecting contemporary trends in ecocriticism, posthumanism, and new materialisms, this turn to the aesthetics and experience of exhaustion has only become more urgent in the context of the current pandemic.

To scholars of modernism, however, the thinking and writing of exhaustion are not new. One need only consult Deleuze's influential essay on Samuel Beckett, "The Exhausted," or consider the correspondences between "figures of thought," such as the rhizome, with earlier (e.g. Franz Kafka's "The Burrow") and later (e.g. Édouard Glissant's "Poetics of Relation") writing on the labyrinthine figuration of alienation/relation, to trace the long trajectory of exhaustion as a modernist inheritance of contemporary humanities scholarship.

This seminar proposes a cross-disciplinary conversation between scholars of contemporary ecocriticism and scholars of modernism, setting the virtual table for a discussion of exhaustion in/across both fields. What, for example, does the modernist preoccupation with subjectivity suggest for contemporary thinking that seeks to elaborate the exhaustion of "the human"? What is the significance of exhaustion's "return" in contemporary thought?

Please send any questions to torinmcl@gmail.com
To submit a proposal, please visit https://acla.secure-platform.com/a/  or click here

Critiquing Critique: Post-Critique, New Realisms, and Materialisms (ACLA 2021)
deadline for submissions:
October 31, 2020
full name / name of organization:
Athanassia Williamson and Nicole Grimaldi, New York University
-----------
We inhabit a post-critical moment. In literary and cultural studies, the post-critical turn has yielded new modes of reading, while galvanizing new efforts to think beyond-challenging or perhaps circumventing altogether-the limits of critique. These efforts are not limited, however, to the fields of literary and cultural studies; they track suggestively with new tendencies in contemporary philosophy, namely "New Realism" and its polemic antagonism towards the (loosely branded) legacy of critical theory, which has arguably held a theoretical monopoly in spheres of the humanities not taken with the scientific worldview. Thinkers placed under the banner of "New Realism" (with representatives such as Quentin Meillassoux, Graham Harman, Markus Gabriel, Maurizio Ferraris) share with the post-critical turn in literary and cultural studies a fatigue with the conceptual frameworks of critical theory, as well as a growing intolerance to what might be construed as critical theory's negativist and, at worst, its politically inactive or corrosive legacy.

It is in this same climate that a profusion of so-called "New Materialist" writing has also materialized (a term attributed to authors such as Karen Barad, Rosi Braidotti, Jane Bennett, Manuel DeLanda). Despite divergent styles of approach, neo-materialist discourses generally share a desire to rethink the linguistic paradigm, and exhibit a skepticism about the prevailing modes of critique in philosophy and in literary studies. Similar to the proponents of post-critique and New Realism, neo-materialist writers negotiate their critical theory inheritances while indexing speculative and experimental alternatives to critique.

This seminar is interested in thinking carefully about these three distinct trends as signaling a broader shift away from deeply ingrained methods of philosophical and literary critique. How can we account for the multiple disciplinary origins of critique and post-critique, as well as their possible futures?

We welcome papers that consider, challenge, or corroborate the antagonism towards critique.
Possible topics may include:
- The speculative turn
- The relevance of critique, post-critique, New Realism, and New Materialism to critical race, queer, feminist, minoritarian, socialist thought
- Critiquing the critique of critique
- The inheritance of Nietzscheanism and the critical legacies of Marx and Freud
- Foucault/Kant ("Fou-Kant")
- New formalisms (e.g. Levine, Kornbluh)
- The turn to ordinary language philosophy-especially after Wittgenstein, Cavell, Austin
- Corrosive versus affirmative styles of thought
- Modes of reading (reparative, surface, distant, descriptive, intensive, affective) in the context of post-critique
- "Paranoid reading" (Sedgwick) / "diagnostic revelation" (Jameson) / the "hermeneutics of suspicion" (Ricoeur) / "anarcho-vitalism" (Kornbluh)
- The alignment of critique or post-critique with radical and/or liberal (gradualist) reformism
- Experiments with genre / critical moods and modes
- Ecological, vitalist, and vibrant new materialisms
- "Concept-work": conceptual convention and reinvention (Stoler)
- Transversalist, (trans-)individualist, post-humanist methods
- Forms of "mobile thought" (Foucault)
- The arguable apoliticism/ahistoricism of new realist and new materialist discourses
- Subject-decentering / anti-anthropocentric orientations

The annual meeting of the ACLA will take place virtually between April 8-11, 2021. Please submit your proposal (up to 300 words) via the online ACLA portal by October 31, 2020.
https://acla.secure-platform.com/a/solicitations/2/sessiongallery/262
Please email the co-organizers Nicole Grimaldi (nicole.grimaldi@nyu.edu ) and Athanassia Williamson (aaw435@nyu.edu ) with any queries.

The American Comparative Literature Association's 2021 Annual Meeting is set to take place April 8-11, 2020, in a fully virtual format.

Call for Proposals - Modernism and Other Exhaustions at ACLA 2021

Exhaustion is once again in vogue in the humanities. Earlier in 2020, ACLA seminars on "Decay Theory," "Despair," and "revolutionary exhaustion" proposed to map scholarly responses to affective, material, and ecological depletion under global late capital, resurgent nationalisms, and technological "progress." Reflecting contemporary trends in ecocriticism, posthumanism, and new materialisms, this turn to the aesthetics and experience of exhaustion has only become more urgent in the context of the current pandemic.

To scholars of modernism, however, the thinking and writing of exhaustion are not new. One need only consult Deleuze's influential essay on Samuel Beckett, "The Exhausted," or consider the correspondences between "figures of thought," such as the rhizome, with earlier (e.g. Franz Kafka's "The Burrow") and later (e.g. Édouard Glissant's "Poetics of Relation") writing on the labyrinthine figuration of alienation/relation, to trace the long trajectory of exhaustion as a modernist inheritance of contemporary humanities scholarship.

This seminar proposes a cross-disciplinary conversation between scholars of contemporary ecocriticism and scholars of modernism, setting the virtual table for a discussion of exhaustion in/across both fields. What, for example, does the modernist preoccupation with subjectivity suggest for contemporary thinking that seeks to elaborate the exhaustion of "the human"? What is the significance of exhaustion's "return" in contemporary thought?

Please send any questions to torinmcl@gmail.com.
To submit a proposal, please visit https://acla.secure-platform.com/a/  or click here


Elegy Today:
Revisions, Rejections, Re-Mappings
Seminar Proposal for the American Comparative Literature Association 2021


Annual Meeting
8-11 April 2021
Click this link for more information 

Organizers:
Dr Adele Bardazzi, University of Oxford (adele.bardazzi@mod-langs.ox.ac.uk) and
Roberto Binetti, University of Oxford (roberto.binetti@st-annes.ox.ac.uk)
Chair: Professor Jonathan Culler

‘Why do I tell you these things? | You are not even here', John Ashbery writes in ‘This Room'. Answering this question, as Culler highlights in Theory of the Lyric, might be what studying the lyric is all about. Elegy is marked by its primarily lyric mode and its generic features. The term elegy has been often used as a sub-genre of lyric poetry. If the process of ‘lyricization of poetry', to use Virginia Jackson words, involves the
evacuation the specificities of elegiac poetry, does the elegy maintain some of its characteristic markers? Or did it become such a malleable and mobile term that it can now accommodate almost any type of poetry relating to mourning? This seminar aims to discuss whether or not this view is helpful when approaching twenty-first century literature.

Genre has been at the center of recent scholarship's attempts at defining lyric poetry, including the elegy. Nonetheless, definitions and labels have been losing ground or, at least, have been problematized since the introduction of the different strands of ‘studies'. The questioning of genre does not pair with an actual disappearance of certain types of traditions, cultural strategies, and stylistic forms. This is the case with elegy.
Even if rooted in classical legacy, elegy still constitutes a problematic, and yet highly fertile term. Indeed, elegy and elegiac are terms that continue to be used today. This suggests the need to consider whether it is still helpful to provide an allen compassing definition of the elegy or whether its current hybridity and attempts to blur boundaries between genres and literary forms is more in tune with current trends
that genre studies has taken.

More information on the ACLA Annual Meeting can be found through this link: https://www.acla.org/annual-meeting
To submit a paper proposal, please visit the ACLA website. The deadline for submissions is 31st October 2020.


Oxford Research in English

Oxford Research in English (ORE) is the academic journal of the University of Oxford's Department of English Language and Literature and is staffed by its graduate students.

The journal is peer-reviewed and MLA-indexed (ISSN: 2397-2947), making it a fully-functioning, professional online publication. Since it began in 2014, it has published 11 issues, including some 55 peer-reviewed articles. It also encourages features and book reviews: it has published around 16 of each of those.

As a journal, it covers all periods and genres and many literary worlds too, though it has its centre of gravity in English literature. Its mission is to provide graduate students of English at Oxford and beyond with a supportive and professional introduction to the world of academic publishing. It seeks to be an encouraging way to get the ball rolling when it comes to gaining some experience in getting the work of aspiring academics out there for people other than their supervisors and examiners.

It has 2 themed issues each calendar year, one in Spring and one in Autumn, and this year both will be based on submissions from an open Call for Papers.

ORE is currently seeking papers of 5-8,000 words for its 12th issue, on the theme of 'TRASH', to be released in Spring 2021. Please send all submissions (as attachments) to ore@ell.ox.ac.uk by November 30th, 2020. For further details, including our style guide, please visit our website at https://oxfordresearchenglish.wordpress.com/ . We look forward to reading your work soon! 

CFP: Bordered States: FOOT 2021 Conference Call for Proposals  

The 29th annual Forum of Original Theatre/Theory/Thought (FOOT) conference at the University of Toronto's Centre for Drama, Theatre, and Performance Studies invites proposals on the theme of Bordered States. As we navigate this year of uncertainty, the conference will be held virtually and synchronously over Zoom from February 25 - 27, 2021.

Borders create. They create nation, culture, and community. They can bring people together and force others apart. As we prepare this call for proposals in a time marked by physical distancing, isolation, and quarantines, we find ourselves acutely aware of the many borders that surround us. The global politics of 2020 are also preoccupied with the tensions of bordered existence. From the recent surge in regionalism and protectionism, to restrictions on domestic and international travel in response to the COVID-19 crisis, worldwide calls for racial justice by the Black Lives Matter movement, and protests against pipelines that threaten to encroach on unceded Indigenous territory - across the world, borders are constantly being performed, interrogated, reinforced, and transgressed.

FOOT 2021: Bordered States seeks to engage with this bordered existence through the lens of performance. How are borders performed? How are bordered identities expressed? How have borders been explored in creative ways through art, theatre, music, media, and dance? We are particularly interested in the multiple meanings that the theme presents. We take ‘bordered states' to mean:
• a bordered State - that is, a nation, country, province, or territory
• the state of being bordered - that is, the state of living in, on, or in-between borders of culture, identity, technology, or place

The Forum of Original Theatre/Theory/Thought (formerly, ‘Festival of Original Theatre') began as a graduate student-led initiative to showcase dramatic works. This event has since grown into a conference that includes academic papers, panels, and performances. FOOT 2021: Bordered States welcomes both artistic and scholarly submissions of any type. These may take the form of performances, scholarly papers, workshops, working groups, panels, staged readings, works of art, and any creative or embodied exploration of the theme. We encourage submissions that engage with the digital and online nature of the conference.
Possible topics might include, but are certainly not limited to:
• Intersections of performance and nation, nationhood, or nationality
• National, international, or regional borders
• Borders of culture, race, gender, or identity
• Artistic and theatrical expressions of bordered identities
• Digital or virtual borders - especially in the time of COVID-19
• Black performance
• Indigenous Performance
• Postcolonial and/or diaspora theatre and performance
• Performance and/as protest
• Queer identity and performance
• The impact of COVID-19 on Drama, Theatre, and Performance Studies
• Interdisciplinary borders of Drama, Theatre, and Performance Studies
• Micronations and other self-declared states

Submit your proposals here

We welcome proposals from anyone seeking to engage with the conference theme in a scholarly and/or creative way. As a community of scholars in Drama, Theatre, and Performance Studies, we acknowledge the interdisciplinary and ‘bordered' nature of our own field, and are therefore excited to consider proposals from any and all of the following:
• Scholars, graduate and undergraduate students in Drama, Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies
• Scholars, graduate and undergraduate students in a variety of related fields in the Humanities and Social Sciences including Women and Gender Studies, Political Science, Sociology, Comparative Literature, Diaspora and Transnational Studies, and more
• Artists, practitioners, and industry professionals
• Independent scholars
Submit your proposal by October 19, 2020 at: foot2021.com/cfp. Download a PDF copy of the Call for Proposals.

Questions? Please email us at info@foot2021.com  

 

Site Information:

Site Tools:

Click below for directions to the University of Toronto!

University of Toronto, St. George Campus
Map of St. George Campus
UTM
Map of Mississauga Campus
UTSC
Map of Scarborough Campus

We wish to acknowledge this land on which the University of Toronto operates. For thousands of years it has been the traditional land of the Huron-Wendat, the Seneca, and the Mississaugas of the Credit. Today, this meeting place is still the home to many Indigenous people from across Turtle Island and we are grateful to have the opportunity to work on this land.