Department of English

University of Toronto

Call For Papers

Note: For a comprehensive compilation of international CFPs, visit
UPENNs English CALL FOR PAPERS Archive.
NB: Included on this web-page are CFPs of particular interest to the
University of Toronto Department of English Faculty and/or students.



To submit information for posting, please write to Wajiha Rasul, Program Assistant, Communications and Alumni Officer: wajiha.rasul@utoronto.ca.

CFP: Making Stories in the Early Modern World

December 10
CALL FOR PAPER
Toronto, Ontario, Canada, 1-3 November 2019

Deadline for submission: 10 December 2018

Organizers
Toronto Renaissance and Reformation Colloquium
CRRS

The Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, the Toronto Renaissance and Reformation Colloquium and York University are celebrating the careers and scholarship of Elizabeth and Thomas Cohen. Over the past three decades, their ground-breaking studies, both joint and individual, on the social and cultural life of early modern Italy have shaped how scholars think about interpersonal and political interactions, honour and shame, gender, community, space and orality in the pre-modern world. In particular, they have attended to stories – the tales early modern individuals lived and told, how they told them and why, as well how scholars access, give meaning to, reconstruct and retell them. Drawing on historical and cognate disciplines, their work has led scholars to reckon with the tangled forces that shaped culture, social experience, subjectivity, and action.

This conference will explore both early modern stories and story-telling and the many ways that scholars have reconstructed and told that past. Papers may reflect perspectives ranging from the individual to the institutional, or comment on the state of current scholarship and new directions of inquiry.

We welcome contributions from all disciplines and geographic areas and from comparative perspectives, that focus on the early modern world broadly defined (1350-1700), as well as contributions reflecting on methodological and theoretical issues.

Proposals should include: 1. the title of the presentation and a 150-word abstract; 2. one-page CV containing contact information for the presenter.

Proposals should be emailed in Word format to both conference organizers:

John Christopoulos john.christopoulos@ubc.ca
John Hunt john.hunt@uvu.edu

Deadline for submission: 10 December 2018

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CFP: Call for Papers 2018 Graduate English Conference - Classification

 Keynote Speaker: Professor Julietta Singh (Universityof Richmond)

 Language islegislation, speech is its code. We do not see the power which is in speechbecause we forget that all speech is a classification, and that allclassifications are oppressive.

Roland Barthes (1977)

 [T]he process ofcategorizing—or, in identity terms, naming—is not unilateral. . . . Recognizingthat identity politics takes place at the site where categories intersect thusseems more fruitful than challenging the possibility of talking aboutcategories at all.

 Kimberlé Crenshaw (1991)

 ---

 In the wake of three centuries of Enlightenment philosophy Henri Bergsonattacked the hubris of a scientistic faith in the ability of the human mind toclassify, conceptualize, and master the flux of life through reason. Arguingthat an intellect adapted to the study of inanimate material could nevercapture life itself, he proclaimed that "In vain we force the living intothis or that one of our molds. All the molds crack."

Acts of classification and categorization have found no shortage ofhostility from critics in the last century. This hostility is captured in theabove quote from Roland Barthes, who alleges that "all classifications areoppressive," or Jacques Derrida's insistence that "there is no idealization that keeps itself pure,safe from all contamination." Resistance to the taxonomic impulse hasrecently returned in Graham Harman's account of ontologically"withdrawn" objects, Karen Barad's "intra-action," and ahost of other thinkers engaging with the nascent fields of "SpeculativeRealism" and "New Materialisms."  Ecological thinkers like Lawrence Buell haveattacked the Western world's obsession with rational mastery for being thefoundation of environmental exploitation. Timothy Morton has recently extendedthis argument by asserting that certain beings—"hyperobjects" likeclimate change—exist on scales too large to be meaningfully conceptualized byhumans.

In contrast to thinkers like Barthes who emphasize the violence ofclassification, there are many strands of thought that seek to harness classification'sproductive and critical capabilities. Bruno Latour has recently argued thatfinding “the right interpretive key,” rather than disavowingclassification and conceptualization entirely, is necessary to grapple with thecomplexity of technological modernity. Foucault's "reversediscourse," Spivak's "strategic essentialism," Crenshaw's"intersectionality," and Puar's "conviviality" are a just afew influential concepts that seek to affirm the usefulness of classificationfor the struggles of oppressed peoples.

Lastly, work in areas of literary, film, and visual culture studies arestructured by classifications: historical periods, media, and genres remaindisciplinary forces that organize scholarly work in these fields (and thestructure of university departments, journals, and conferences). In literarystudies, scholars are eager to define and classify modes of reading andinterpretation—suspicious, reparative, distant, and surface are just a few ofthese categories that have received attention. Caroline Levine's recent workhas reinvigorated many critics' desire to name and classify literary forms. Allof this has happened even as scholars increasingly pursue"interdisciplinary" forms of inquiry.

Our conference seeks papers that investigate, criticize, reformulate, orcreate classifications—or that think with, about, or against the theme ofclassification itself.

The “Classification” conference will be held at the University of Toronto’s Department of English in the Jackman Humanities Buildingon Friday, April 27th, 2018. Lunch and refreshments will be provided. Papers of 15-20 minutes will be delivered in panels of three, with questio nperiods to follow.

DEADLINE EXTENDED: Applications should be sent to uoftgradconference2018@gmail.com by February 23, 2018. Please include:

1.     An abstract describingyour paper (max. 300 words)

2.     A short biography (max.50 words)

For further inquiries, please contact the U of T GEAconference committee at uoftgradconference2018@gmail.com

Possible topics include:


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CFP: 2nd Call for Papers2017 Shakespearean Theatre Conference"Shakespeare 401: What's Next?"

We invite proposals for 20-minute papers, full sessions, and workshops for the second Shakespearean Theatre Conference, to be held June 22-24, 2017. All approaches to Tudor-Stuart drama and its afterlives are welcome. In the wake of the Shakespeare quatercentenary, we especially encourage papers that think broadly and creatively about the future of this drama. How can old plays best speak to the diversity of contemporary identities? What new critical and creative directions seem particularly promising? Which established practices remained indispensable? What -- or who -- is due for a revival? 

Plenary speakers:Sarah Beckwith (Duke University)Martha Henry (Stratford Festival)Peter Holland (University of Notre Dame)Julia Reinhard Lupton (University of California, Irvine) 

The conference is a joint venture of the University of Waterloo and the Stratford Festival, and will bring together scholars and practitioners to talk about how performance influences scholarship and vice versa. Paper sessions will be held at the University of Waterloo's Stratford campus, with plays and special events hosted by the Stratford Festival. The conference schedule will include free time to attend evening performances of Twelfth Night, Timon of Athens, and The Changeling. By arriving a day early or leaving a day late, conference goers can expand their choice of Stratford productions to include Romeo and Juliet, The School for Scandal, and Bakkhai, among others. Additional conference information will be posted at https://uwaterloo.ca/english/shakespeare as it becomes available. 

Full details of the Festival's schedule are available at https://www.stratfordfestival.ca.By January 31, 2017, please send proposals to Shakespeare@uwaterloo.ca.


CFP: 2017 Graduate English Conference - Endings

In his 1950 Nobel acceptance speech, William Faulkner famously derided the apocalyptic mentality. Praising the unique resilience of the human species, he proclaimed: “I decline to accept the end of man.” More than sixty years later, the “end of man” is no longer a deniable premise, it is an inevitable reality. Timothy Morton argues that “the end of the world has already occurred,” describing the Anthropocene as an essentially post-apocalyptic era, in which irreversible effects of human technologies have set the wheels of global demise in motion. The ever-increasing imminence of global environmental crisis, the persistent threat of nuclear warfare, the supplementation of human bodies and cognitive faculties by machines, the spread of deadly disease—we are living in the hypertrophic overdetermination of an ending. Proceeding from the ineluctable horizon of human demise, the GEA is seeking papers that think with and about the concept of “Endings” for its 2017 conference.

Submissions need not limit themselves to the prospect of human extinction; they can interrogate the capacious topic of “endings” in all its significations. The problematic of endings intersects with literature at several salient junctures: from the ending of a narrative arc, to the literary representation of the end of life, to the telos or “ends” of literary criticism as such. Deleuze and Guattari praise literature’s capacity to “overthrow ontology, do away with foundations, nullify endings and beginnings.” Elsewhere, the obsolescence of literary forms––or indeed the end of literature itself––has been a persistent preoccupation for authors and critics alike, while today new technologies pose an existential threat to the materiality of the book, and neoliberal governance allocates increasingly fewer resources for literary and academic endeavours.

Just as endings are written into beginnings, so beginnings find rich soil in the detritus of what has passed away. Endings announce possibilities for articulation: Arundhati Roy writes, “My world has died, I write to mourn its passing.” The conference seeks, finally, to interrogate the relationship of endings to potential beginnings and to perform a reappraisal of the principle that, in T.S. Eliot’s words, “Every phrase and every sentence is an end and a beginning.”

Possible topics include:
- Ecocriticism and the Anthropocene: ecopoetics, environmental literature, climate realism, disaster and crisis, climate change
- Narrative endings: genre, happy endings, twist endings, the marriage plot, hetero-narrative closure
- Extinction, literal and figurative
- Periodization: the end of events, eras, movements
- “Post-x”: postcolonial studies, posthumanism, the postcritical turn/postcritique, post-truth politics, postcapitalism, post-Marxism
- Futures and non-futures: utopias, dystopias, (post-)apocalypses, temporalities, queer temporalities, imaginaries
- Ends: objectives, goals, methodologies, teleologies
- The end of life: aging, illness, disease
- Death, literal and figurative: social life/death, slow death, the undead- Revelations, messianism, eschatology
- Obsolescence and technology: the end of the book, planned obsolescence, technological apocalypse
- The nuclear question: nuclear warfare, nuclear winter, mutually assured destruction
- Beginnings and non-endings: the end of endings, perpetuity, reproduction, infinity, circularity, birth, rejuvenation, resurrection

The “Endings” conference will be held at the University of Toronto’s Department of English in the Jackman Humanities Building on Thursday, April 27th, 2017. Lunch and refreshments will be provided. Papers of 15-20 minutes will be delivered in panels of three, with question periods to follow.Applications should be sent to utorontogradconference@gmail.com by February 1st, 2017. Please include:1. An abstract describing your paper (max. 300 words)2. A short biography (max. 50 words)For further inquiries, please contact the U of T GEA conference committee at utorontogradconference@gmail.com


CFP: CALL FOR PAPERSCSECS – Canadian Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies / NEASECS – Northeast American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (Joint Annual Conference, Toronto, Ontario, 18-22 October 2017).

From Cosmopolitans to Cosmopolitanisms

Proposals for panels due by 1 February 2017. Proposals for papers due by 1 March 2017.Across the long eighteenth century virtually every form of visual and textual representation and almost every area of intellectual enquiry was transformed by a changing sense of the world and its inhabitants. That change came in response to the practical experience of intercultural communication and exchange arising from both increased commerce and increasingly global conflict. Narratives of travel and contact, images depicting cultural difference both small and large, fictions of worlds new, old and exotic flooded the cultural marketplace. Theorists of statecraft and governance both then and now recognize this period as a crucial moment where conceptions of nationhood, empire, citizenship, diplomacy and globality were first broached. Kant’s desire for a cosmopolitical future was partly spurred by a century of almost continual war.

For their joint annual meeting, the Canadian Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies and the Northeast American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies invite panel and paper submissions that address this topic in all of its complexity. The meeting will be held at the Chelsea Hotel in Toronto, Ontario, 18-22 October 2017 and is co-hosted by colleagues from the University of Toronto and local institutions including Humber College, Ryerson University and York University.

We invite proposals that investigate the cosmopolitan in a range of fields, including but not limited to literature, art and architecture, book history, education, geography, history, history of science, indigenous studies, law, linguistics, music, philosophy and political science. Among the many issues raised under this topic the organizing committee is interested in panels and proposals that address the definition of cosmopolitanism itself both in the eighteenth century and within our current critical moment, the practice of intercultural exchange that leads to the assertion or cancellation of cosmopolitan identity, the circulation of goods and peoples that impinge on emergent and disappearing understandings of the “world” and its citizens, the theorization of the desire for identities beyond that of nation, tribe or clan, the resistances to such “worlding” desires, and the specific representation of cultural contact, cultural difference and exchange. This may well be a conference populated by travellers, pirates, painters, diplomats, merchants, jurists, castaways and philosophers, some no doubt enthusiastic to the promises of cosmopolitanism, some attuned to its cost, and some skeptical about its claims.

In keeping with CSECS and NEASECS tradition, panels and papers devoted to elements of the long eighteenth century not directly related to the conference theme are also welcome. Papers in either French or English are welcome. Individual proposals should include a 150-word abstract of the paper and its title, and a 150-word biographical statement including your name, academic status, institutional affiliation, membership (CSECS/NEASECS), and e-mail address. Panel proposals should include the above, as well as a brief description of the panel itself.

Please send panel proposals by 1 February 2017; paper proposals by 1 March 2017 to email CSECS2017@utoronto.ca.


CFP: American Literature in the World Graduate Conference at Yale University

The conference hopes to broaden the scope of American literature, opening it to more complex geographies, and to a variety of genres and media. The impetus comes partly from a survey of what is currently in the field: it is impossible to read the work of Junot Diaz and Edwidge Danticat, Robert Hass and Jorie Graham, Dave Eggers and Jhumpa Lahiri without seeing that, for all these authors, the reference frame is no longer simply the United States, but a larger, looser, more contextually varied set of coordinates, populated by laboring bodies, migrating faiths, generational sagas, memories of war, as well as the accents of unforgotten tongues, the taste and smell of beloved foods and spices. 

The twenty-first century is a good century to think about American literature in the world. But other centuries are equally fertile ground, as the writings of Anne Bradstreet, Margaret Fuller, Herman Melville, Edith Wharton, Mark Twain, Richard Wright, Gertrude Stein, Ezra Pound, Langston Hughes, and Elizabeth Bishop make abundantly clear. To study these and countless other authors is to see that the United States and the world are neither separate nor antithetical, but part of the same analytic fabric. Our conference explores these extended networks through many channels: from the cultural archives circulating across the Atlantic, the Pacific, and the Indian Oceans as well as Caribbean Sea; to the dynamic interactions between indigenous populations and those newly arrived; from the institutions of print, to the tangled ecologies of literature, art, theater, music, and film, to the digital globalism of the present moment.

The conference is generously supported by the Beinecke Library, the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, the English Department, the American Studies Program, the African American Studies Department, the Ethnicity, Race, and Migration Program, the Comparative Literature Department, the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, the Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures, and the Film Studies Program at Yale University. We offer a $300 travel stipend to those coming from outside the tri-state area.Conference attendees are also invited to a slate of related events: a research workshop with Melissa Barton, Curator at the Beinecke Library; a publication workshop with Wai Chee Dimock, William Lampson Professor of English and American Studies at Yale and the editor of PMLA, and Jordan Brower, co-editor of American Literature in the World: An Anthology from Anne Bradstreet to Octavia Butler (Columbia University Press, 2016); and a “Performing American Literature” mini-festival on Thursday, April 6.Please send a 1-page abstract (250-650 words) to brandon.menke@yale.edu by December 1.

amlitintheworld.yale.edu/2017-conference


CFP: Britain, Canada, and the Arts: Cultural Exchange as Post-war Renewal

15-17 June 2017CALL FOR PAPERSPapers are invited for a major international, interdisciplinary conference to be held at Senate House, London, in collaboration with the School of English, Communication and Philosophy (Cardiff University) and the University of Westminster. Coinciding with and celebrating the 150th anniversary of Canadian Confederation, this conference will focus on the strong culture of artistic exchange, influence, and dialogue between Canada and Britain, with a particular but not exclusive emphasis on the decades after World War II.

Proposals (max. 250 words) for papers of 20 minutes can be sent to the organizers, Irene Morra (Cardiff University) and John Wyver (University of Westminster), at canbritconference@gmail.com by 1 December 2016.


CFP: Canadian Society for Renaissance Studies

The 2017 conference of the Canadian Society for Renaissance Studies will be hosted by Ryerson University in Toronto as a part of the Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences’ annual Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences. The theme for Congress 2017, the year of Canada’s sesquicentennial, is “From Far & Wide: The Next 150.”

The CSRS invites members to submit proposals that address this theme in relation to the early modern period, or on any Renaissance topic in a variety of disciplines, including literature, history, philosophy, music, art history, history of the book, bibliography, digital humanities, medicine, and cultural studies. Cross-disciplinary and interdisciplinary proposals are also welcome. Proposals can be submitted in either English or French, and should fall into one of the following categories:

a) an individual proposal (maximum 300 words) for a 20-minute paper;
b) a panel of three proposed 20-minute papers on a shared theme (to be submitted in one file including the names and institutional affiliations of the organizer and participants, the proposed title of the session, and 300-word abstracts of the three papers);
c) a workshop or panel discussion (to be submitted in one file including the names and institutional affiliations of the organizer and proposed panelists, the proposed title of the session, and a 300-word paragraph outlining the focus and goals of the session, as well as the anticipated contributions of participants).

Please note that this year the deadline for submitting a proposal is: 15th January 2017 (for individual proposals and completed panel proposals).

Please submit your proposal or proposed panel to Dr. Katie Larson, 2017 CSRS/SCÉR Program Chair, at this email address, no later than 15 January 2017:
csrs.scercongress2017@gmail.com


CFP: Comparing Canada

The deadline to submit an individual paper or panel proposal for the 27th Annual Conference of the Centre for Comparative Literature at the University of Toronto, Comparing Canada(s), to take place on 3-4 March, 2017, has been extended: abstract submissions will now be due on 31 October, 2016 by 11:59pm.Please find attached the call for papers with specific guidelines (also available online at http://conference.complit.utoronto.ca/canada/call-for-papers/); abstracts should be submitted online at http://conference.complit.utoronto.ca/canada/call-for-papers/abstract-submission/.


CFP: Form, Function, Intent

Texts inhabit many material forms: they can be passed down orally, marked on papyrus scrolls, handwritten into spiral-bound notebooks, and typed into digital blogs. Scholars of book history, information sciences, media studies, and digital humanities have long maintained that form is inseparable from content. Whether physically recorded or orally transmitted, texts codify human experience as factual, aspirational, instructional, and/or normative. Literary critic Caroline Levine argues that different material literary forms enable different “affordances”, or expressive potentialities. Consider the glossy pages of a fashion magazine, the seals and stamps on legal documents, or the hypertext within born-digital texts. Additionally, the iterative process of recording human experiences results in the codification of practices: from publishing for academic or commercial purposes, to self-publishing, to writing for social media platforms like blogs or Twitter, as well as how communities collect, classify, describe, arrange, and make use of these texts. The rapidly evolving digital world further emphasizes the need to engage with the relationship between form, content, and knowledge.

In light of this year’s University of Toronto Book History & Print Culture colloquium theme “The Codification of Knowledge,” we ask participants to consider the socio-cultural, political, linguistic, and aesthetic concerns of the material forms in which knowledge is recorded or created. How does the material framing of a text shape how the text authorizes, alters, creates, or otherwise transmits information? What is the reader’s role in receiving codified information? Can we use form to begin to challenge and unpack established and “official” forms of knowledge and, if so, how? And ultimately, what counts as “materiality”?

We welcome applications from graduate students, independent scholars, and emerging academics working in any discipline, time-period, and geographical region.

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to, the following:
· Challenging definitions of material form
· Types of textual intent (e.g. instructional, normative, professionalizing, legal, performative, descriptive).
· The relationship between textual intent and material form
· Codified practices in textual production, (e.g. peer-review processes, textual editing, design, and distribution)
· Orality, oral histories, and passing on knowledge orally
· Debates regarding print versus digital form
· Gaming forms and interactive fiction
· Deviations from the “norm” within form/content relationships
· Questioning dichotomies between fluid and rigid notions of materiality in creative versus non-creative texts.

SUBMISSION INSTRUCTIONSPaper proposals:Single document containing the following elements:1) Abstract (150-200 words)2) Biographical statement of the presenter (100-150 words)Multi-person panel proposals:Single document containing the following elements:1) Brief overview of the proposed panel theme2) For each panel presenter, 150-200 word abstracts3) Biographical statement of each presenter (100-150 words)Deadline for paper and panel proposals is December 11th, 2016. To submit an abstract or for further inquiries, please contact:bhpccolloquium2017@gmail.com




CPF: American Literature in the World Graduate ConferenceYale UniversityApril 7, 2017

The conference hopes to broaden the scope of American literature, opening it to more complex geographies, and to a variety of genres and media. The impetus comes partly from a survey of what is currently in the field: it is impossible to read the work of Junot Diaz and Edwidge Danticat, Robert Hass and Jorie Graham, Dave Eggers and Jhumpa Lahiri without seeing that, for all these authors, the reference frame is no longer simply the United States, but a larger, looser, more contextually varied set of coordinates, populated by laboring bodies, migrating faiths, generational sagas, memories of war, as well as the accents of unforgotten tongues, the taste and smell of beloved foods and spices.

The twenty-first century is a good century to think about American literature in the world. But other centuries are equally fertile ground, as the writings of Anne Bradstreet, Margaret Fuller, Herman Melville, Edith Wharton, Mark Twain, Richard Wright, Gertrude Stein, Ezra Pound, Langston Hughes, and Elizabeth Bishop make abundantly clear. To study these and countless other authors is to see that the United States and the world are neither separate nor antithetical, but part of the same analytic fabric. Our conference explores these extended networks through many channels: from the cultural archives circulating across the Atlantic, the Pacific, and the Indian Oceans as well as Caribbean Sea; to the dynamic interactions between indigenous populations and those newly arrived; from the institutions of print, to the tangled ecologies of literature, art, theater, music, and film, to the digital globalism of the present moment.

The conference is generously supported by the Beinecke Library, the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, the English Department, the American Studies Program, the African American Studies Department, the Ethnicity, Race, and Migration Program, the Comparative Literature Department, the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, the Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures, and the Film Studies Program at Yale University. We offer a $300 travel stipend to those coming from outside the tri-state area.

Conference attendees are also invited to a slate of related events: a research workshop with Melissa Barton, Curator at the Beinecke Library; a publication workshop with Wai Chee Dimock, William Lampson Professor of English and American Studies at Yale and the editor of PMLA, and Jordan Brower, co-editor of American Literature in the World: An Anthology from Anne Bradstreet to Octavia Butler (Columbia University Press, 2016); and a “Performing American Literature” mini-festival on Thursday, April 6.Please send a 1-page abstract to brandon.menke@yale.edu by December 1.


CFP: Many Happy Returns: The Anniversary in Victorian BritainA Joint Panel of the Victorian Studies Association of Ontario (VSAO) andthe Association of Canadian College and University Teachers of English Conference (ACCUTE)Ryerson University, Toronto27-30 May 2017 

Questions and submissions should be sent to: VSAOatACCUTE@gmail.com. Please submit the following as separate attachments by 1 November 2016:- a proposal of 300-500 words without personal identifying marks- an abstract of 100 words and a bio of 50 words- a 2017 Proposal Information Sheet, available on the ACCUTE website: https://accute.ca/accute-conference/joint-panels/- Speakers must be members of VSAO and ACCUTE at the time of the conference. The second oldest Victorian studies association in the world, the VSAO welcomes new members from universities, libraries, museums – all those who share an interest in Victorian culture. For more information about the VSAO, please visit http://vsao.apps01.yorku.ca


CFP: The Humanities Graduate Student Association (HuGSA) and the Graduate Program in Humanities at York University are pleased to announce an interdisciplinary conference interrogating the enduring human fascination with death, dying, and the dead—in senses both figurative and literal—encompassing the many cultural moments of the human experience. Titled "Crossing Over: an Interdisciplinary Conference on Death and Morbidity," the conference will be held on February 17th and 18th, 2017 at the Holiday Inn Toronto–Yorkdale. We are also pleased to announce our Saturday Keynote with Professor Patricia Rae from Queen's University (Kingston, ON).

Submissions may take the form of 20-minute papers, or 12–15 minute round table papers in either English or French. Other submissions, in the form of poster sessions, visual art, or performance, will also be considered. For more information about registering for the conference and event details, please refer to our website: www.yuhumaconference.wordpress.com.



CFP: SUNY Plattsburgh will host an international bicentenary conference called "Jane Austen & the Arts" March 23-25, 2017. 

We warmly welcome the University of Toronto's faculty and students (both graduate and advanced undergraduates) to attend the conference and submit paper proposals. 

Conference details and deadlines can be found at http://janeaustenandthearts.com and below.




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