Summer 2024 Timetable

Courses and room assignments are listed in the 2024 Summer Session Timetable (search: “English”).

100 Level

The courses in our 100 series introduce students to the study of English literature at the university level through broad courses that introduce the major literary forms via examples drawn from different times and places. These courses aim to develop writing, reading, and critical skills, and frequently require some oral participation in tutorial groups. Essays at the 100 level typically do not require research or secondary sources. 

200 Level

Courses in the 200 series provide historically, geographically, generically, or theoretically grounded introductions to the study of English literature. These include the four "gateway" courses required of Specialists and Majors--introductions to the major national-historical fields (British, Canadian, and American) that comprise literatures in English--as well as a wide range of courses that will prepared students for further study. Coursework at the 200 level may require some research and the beginnings of familiarity with scholarship on the subject. Students will often be expected to participate orally in class or in tutorial groups. English 200-level courses are open to students who have obtained standing in 1.0 ENG FCE, or ANY 4.0 University-level FCE, or who are concurrently taking one of ENG110Y1, ENG140Y1, ENG150Y1. 

300 Level

At the 300 level, courses advance into a particular period or subject within a literature or literary genre: contemporary American fiction, for instance, or a particular topic in Shakespeare studies. Courses at this level introduce students to research skills and typically require essays that incorporate some secondary sources. The smaller size of many of these courses frequently demands a greater degree of oral participation. Most English 300-level courses are open to students who have obtained standing in at least 4.0 FCE, including 2.0 ENG FCE. 

400 Level

Courses in the 400 series are both advanced and focused, unique courses created by Department faculty that often relate to their own research. Active student participation, including oral presentations, is an important part of these courses. Courses at the 400 level require a substantial research essay for which the student has significant input into framing the research question. Please note, beginning with the 2019-20 FAS Calendar, for NEW 2018 program students, English 400-series courses are open to students who have obtained standing in at least 9.0 FCE, including 4.0 ENG FCE, and who have completed ENG202H1, ENG203H1, ENG250H1, and ENG252H1.

Notes on the Timetable, Enrollment Regulations and Procedures

1. For updated information regarding ROOM ASSIGNMENTS and COURSE CHANGES (NOT ALL OF WHICH ARE ON ACORN), please see the Faculty of Arts and Science Timetable. For updated course descriptions, please see our Undergraduate Timetable above, and follow the SECTION links when available.

Changes to Reading Lists and Instructors - Students should note that changes to scheduling, staffing, reading lists, and methods of evaluation may occur anytime thereafter. When possible, changes to the course schedule will appear on ACORN. Students should avoid purchasing texts until the reading list is confirmed by the instructor during the first week of classes. Students wishing to read listed texts in advance are advised to use copies available at both the University and public libraries.

2. ACORN, the University's student information system consists of a string of 8 characters (for instance, ENG110Y1). The last two characters indicate the weight of the course ("Y" = full credit; "H" = half credit) and the campus: 1 = St. George, 3 = UTSC, 5 = UTM. A separate "Section Code" indicates the session in which the course is being given. The English Department timetable for St. George campus consists of 9 characters, the last of which indicates whether the course is being given in the First session ("F"); Second session ("S"); or in both ("Y").

3. Enrollment in all English courses is limited by Department policy. First-year students may enroll in any 200-series course if they are concurrently enrolled in ENG110Y1, ENG140Y1 or ENG150Y1. In some 200-series courses and all 300-series courses, priority is given to students enrolled in an English program. In 400-series courses, priority during the first round of enrollment is given to fourth-year students who require a 400-series course to satisfy program requirements. To ensure maximum availability of 400-series courses, fourth-year Specialists are allowed to enroll in only 1.0 400-series ENG FCE and fourth-year Majors are allowed to register in only 0.5 400-level ENG FCE. During the second round of enrollment the priority is lifted and the course is open to all students who meet the prerequisites.

Department of English Statement on Attendance and Participation

English courses at the University of Toronto offer a distinctive sense of community, as they aim to foster opportunities both to listen and to be heard. While the requirements of individual instructors and the constraints and opportunities of various courses may differ significantly, the Department of English expects regular, prompt attendance in all courses and active participation when appropriate. Lectures and in-class discussions provide the foundation and context for all written assignments and other forms of evaluation.

By promoting both oral and written proficiency, the English program offers students a set of broadly effective professional and social skills. Regular attendance and informed participation demonstrate a commitment to fellow students and to the ideal of a shared educational experience.

ENG100H1F - Effective Writing

Section Number: LEC0101

Time(s): Monday & Wednesday 10am-1pm

Instructor(s): TBA

Brief Description of Course: TBA

Required Reading: TBA 

First Three Authors and Texts: TBA

Method of Evaluation: TBA


ENG100H1F - Effective Writing

Section Number: LEC0201

Time(s): Tuesday & Thursday 11am-2pm

Instructor(s): TBA

Brief Description of Course: TBA

Required Reading: TBA 

First Three Authors and Texts: TBA

Method of Evaluation: TBA


ENG100H1F - Effective Writing

Section Number: LEC5101

Time(s): Tuesday & Thursday 6pm-9pm ONLINE SYNCHRONOUS

Instructor(s): TBA

Brief Description of Course: TBA

Required Reading: TBA 

First Three Authors and Texts: TBA

Method of Evaluation: TBA


ENG100H1S - Effective Writing

Section Number: LEC0101

Time(s): Tuesday & Thursday 1pm-4pm

Instructor(s): TBA

Brief Description of Course: TBA

Required Reading: TBA 

First Three Authors and Texts: TBA

Method of Evaluation: TBA


ENG100H1S - Effective Writing

Section Number: LEC0201

Time(s): Monday & Wednesday 10am-1pm

Instructor(s): TBA

Brief Description of Course: TBA

Required Reading: TBA 

First Three Authors and Texts: TBA

Method of Evaluation: TBA


ENG100H1S - Effective Writing

Section Number: LEC5101

Time(s): Monday & Wednesday 6pm-9pm ONLINE SYNCHRONOUS

Instructor(s): TBA

Brief Description of Course: TBA

Required Reading: TBA 

First Three Authors and Texts: TBA

Method of Evaluation: TBA


ENG102H1F - Literature and the Sciences

Section Number: LEC0101

Time(s): Monday & Wednesday 4pm-6pm ONLINE SYNCHRONOUS

Instructor(s): Thom Dancer

Brief Description of Course: Like science fiction? Argue with your friends about the depiction of future and fictional worlds and people? Want to learn how to talk with more sophistication about what you like and dislike about art, fiction, and film? Ever wonder what science ficiton novels, stories, and movies tell us about ourselves, our future as a species, the trajectory of technology? This class aims to develop a critical appreciation of popular science fiction, popular culture, and film from the perspective of literary analysis. Central to critical appreciation is the recognition of literature as carefully crafted art form, which basically means coming up with a cogent account of - what a piece of literature “means,” - what it is trying to do to/for the reader, - what technical, verbal, and structural choices the author has made and how they contribute to the overall experience of reading, and so on.

This course introduces students without a background in literary analysis or writing to basics of analysis, interpretation, and study of literature. It is a course that emphasizes the development of reading and thinking and communication skills.

Required Reading: The Fifth Season, N.K. Jemisin; Annihilation, Jeff VanderMeer; Stories by Ursual Le Guin, Geoffrey Landis, Cixin Liu; Movies: Rogue One, Mad Max: Fury Road, Television Episodes from Futurama and Doctor Who.

First Three Authors and Texts: Liu, Le Guin, Landis

Method of Evaluation: Group Work, Quizzes, Test, Essays.


ENG110Y1 - Narrative

Section Number: LEC0101

Time(s): Tuesday & Thursday 10am-1pm

Instructor(s): Michael Johnstone

Brief Description of Course: TBA

Required Reading: TBA 

First Three Authors and Texts: TBA

Method of Evaluation: TBA

ENG202H1F - Introduction to British Literature I

Section Number: LEC0101

Time(s): Tuesday & Thursday 1pm-4pm

Instructor(s): Carroll Balot

Brief Description of Course: A survey of English literature, from its beginnings in the Anglo-Saxon period through Milton in the late seventeenth century, emphasizing major authors, movements and periods, and formal analysis. Central themes will include the relationship between the ancient heroic code and Christian values; the movement from a providential to a modern scientific cosmology; the many forms of love, both sacred and secular; community, individualism, and alienation in the transition to modernity; and sin, shame, and forgiveness. We will employ a variety of approaches to literary analysis, including historicism, psychoanalysis, New Criticism, and modes of political and affective reading.  

Required Reading:  Norton Anthology of English Literature, vols. A&B and Chris Baldick, Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms  

First Three Authors and Texts: Dream of the Rood; Beowulf; Sir Gawain and the Green Knight 

Method of Evaluation: short paper; formal analysis; term tests; participation. 


ENG203H1S - Introduction to British Literature II

Section Number: LEC0101

Time(s): Monday & Wednesday 10am-1pm

Instructor(s): TBA

Brief Description of Course: TBA

Required Reading: TBA 

First Three Authors and Texts: TBA

Method of Evaluation: TBA


ENG215H1F - The Canadian Short Story

Section Number: LEC0101

Time(s): Tuesday & Thursday 1pm-4pm ONLINE SYNCHRONOUS

Instructor(s): Sarah Caskey

Brief Description of Course: The short story is a demanding and exhilarating art form. As the Canadian literary critic W. H. New observes, it “calls upon its readers to perceive the breadth of vision that is condensed into a small compass.” Canadian writers have made outstanding contributions to the genre and this course examines Canadian short fiction written in English since the beginning of the twentieth century to the present.  The short stories selected for analysis reflect a variety of authors, as well as diverse periods, regions, literary styles, thematic interests, and experimentation within the genre.  Together, the stories attest to the vitality of the genre in this country and the important role Canadians writers have played in shaping the form. 

We will focus on reading individual stories closely, with attention to form and structure, and to relating seemingly disparate stories to one another, synthesizing ideas that connect them into a larger short-story literary tradition.  Teaching the stories close to chronological order means we can grasp much of the history of literary influence and the growth and development of the genre in Canada within the boundaries of the syllabus. Throughout the term, we will explore the place of the short story in Canadian literary culture and its exciting intersection with issues including storytelling and art.  

Required Reading: Course readings will be available on the Library Reading List through Quercus.

First Three Authors and Texts: Michael Crummey, Harry Robinson, Thomas King. 

Method of Evaluation: Passage Analysis (25%); Essay (40%); Final Assignment (25%); Participation (10%).  


ENG220H1F - Introduction to Shakespeare

Section Number: LEC0101

Time(s): Tuesday & Thursday 10am - 1pm

Instructor(s): Philippa Sheppard

Brief Description of Course: More than any other author, Shakespeare’s works have shaped our language and our arts, the way we think and see ourselves. He is performed in every language and culture, been adapted to every medium. This course will explore six of Shakespeare’s plays, arranged chronologically and within genre. With reference to performances caught on film, and founded on historical background, we will discuss the dramatization of theme, character, structure, setting and language. We will endeavour to keep in mind the exigencies of the theatre in Shakespeare’s time and in our own. Shakespeare was, after all, a consummate man of the theatre. His plays are blueprints for shows on stage. We will remain open to the plethora of meanings and interpretations suggested by these blueprints in all their infinite variety.

Required Reading: Henry IV Part 1, Much Ado About Nothing, Twelfth Night, Hamlet, Othello, King Lear.

First Three Authors and Texts: Henry IV Part 1, Much Ado About Nothing, Twelfth Night

Method of Evaluation: One in-class essay (20%); one take-home essay (35%); one three-hour exam (35%); participation (10%). I will take attendance each class, and make note of oral contributions, to arrive at the participation mark. Attendance is important. Handing in an outline for the take-home essay is mandatory, and receives a 2 mark bonus on the essay if properly executed. Extensions/Make-up tests only provided for illness or bereavement (with appropriate documentation submitted). Essays should be submitted online.


ENG237H1F - Science Fiction

Section Number: LEC0101

Time(s): Tuesday & Thursday 10am - 1pm

Instructor(s): Stanka Radovic

Brief Description of Course: TBA

Required Reading: TBA 

First Three Authors and Texts: TBA

Method of Evaluation: TBA


ENG250H1F - Introduction to American Literature

Section Number: LEC0101

Time(s): Monday & Wednesday 2pm - 5pm ONLINE SYNCHRONOUS

Instructor(s): Scott Rayter

Brief Description of Course: This course will introduce students to American literature using a variety of genres, including fiction, poetry, and slave narratives, by a number of writers seen as key figures in the American canon, but also some who are less well-known, and we will examine how their works reflect national and individual concerns with freedom and identity, particularly in relation to race, gender and sexuality.  

Required Reading: We will be using the shorter 10th edition of the Norton Anthology of American Literature (2 vols, published July 2022), with works by writers such as Irving, Hawthorne, Jacobs, Melville, Whitman, Dickinson, Crane, Jewett, Bierce, Gilman, James, Frost, Hemingway, Faulkner, O’Hara, Olds, Morrison, and Lahiri. 

First Three Authors and Texts: Irving, Hawthorne, Jacobs, Melville

Method of Evaluation: Take-home Mid-term Test (20%); Essay (35%); Participation (15%); Take-home Exam (30%) 


ENG252H1S - Introduction to Canadian Literature

Section Number: LEC0101

Time(s): Tuesday & Thursday 1pm-4pm

Instructor(s): TBA

Brief Description of Course: TBA

Required Reading: TBA 

First Three Authors and Texts: TBA

Method of Evaluation: TBA


ENG270H1S - Introduction to Colonial and Postcolonial Writing

Section Number: LEC0101

Time(s): Monday & Wednesday 11am-2pm

Instructor(s): TBA

Brief Description of Course: TBA

Required Reading: TBA 

First Three Authors and Texts: TBA

Method of Evaluation: TBA

ENG311H1S - Medieval Literature

Section Number: LEC0101

Time(s): Tuesday & Thursday 2pm-5pm

Instructor(s): Carroll Balot

Brief Description of Course: an introduction to non-Chaucerian medieval literature for advanced undergraduates, with an emphasis on close reading. Our goal will be to formulate and enact a reading practice for each work that grows out of the unique demands of the text itself, considering the way these works have particular visions of the world and our place in it. Moving from the sixth to the 15th centuries, our themes and topics will include British history, chivalry, and nostalgia; imagining death and rebirth; Christian social criticism; and the sanctification of women’s experience. 

Required Reading: The Broadview Anthology of British Literature, Vol.1: The Medieval Period and Pearl (Broadview). The books are available as a package in the university bookstore. 

First Three Authors and Texts: Gildas, selection from The Ruin of Britain; Bede, selection from The Ecclesiastical History of the English People.; The Wanderer; The Wife’s Lament, and The Ruin

Method of Evaluation: Short responses; 5-6 page essay; term tests; participation.


ENG323H1F - Austen & Contemporaries

Section Number: LEC0101

Time(s): Tuesday & Thursday 10am-1pm

Instructor(s): Alex Hernandez

Brief Description of Course: On a stone slab tucked away in Winchester’s cathedral church, Jane Austen’s grave notes that: “the extraordinary endowments of her mind / obtained the regard of all who knew her and / the warmest love of her intimate connections.” A metaphor for the relative obscurity in which she lived her life, the memorial speaks volumes even as it makes no mention of her writing. This course explores that extraordinary mind, placing Austen in the context of her times in several senses. We’ll look to situate her work in a dialogue with that of contemporaries in literature, philosophy, and aesthetics, to read closely as she traces the complex family dynamics of the late Georgian home, and to understand her work as part of a moment of global political upheaval with profound consequences even to this day. To do so, we’ll read a number of her novels, for the most part moving chronologically, making the occasional detour into the work of fellow authors or secondary critical accounts. Students will learn to read her work more critically and develop some facility with the era’s literature, as well as gain an understanding of some of the classic accounts through which scholars have understood this period.

Required Reading: Several—but not too many—of Austen’s novels (Northanger Abbey, Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park, Persuasion), a number of relatively short supplemental works for context, including some poetry and critical works

First Three Authors and Texts: Northanger Abbey, along with some contextualizing material on the gothic

Method of Evaluation: Engaged Participation, an Essay, Term Tests


ENG355H1F - Drama 1603-1642

Section Number: LEC0101

Time(s): Monday & Wednesday 4pm-7pm ONLINE SYNCHRONOUS

Instructor(s): Katherine Williams

Brief Description of Course: TBA

Required Reading: TBA 

First Three Authors and Texts: TBA

Method of Evaluation: TBA


ENG357H1F - New Writing in Canada

Section Number: LEC0101

Time(s): Tuesday & Thursday 1pm-4pm ONLINE SYNCHRONOUS

Instructor(s): Vikki Visvis

Brief Description of Course: A study of fiction published in Canada in the twenty-first century by emerging writers. Focusing on both the novel and the short story collection, we will consider how contemporary fiction in Canada moves in new directions in its treatment of genre and in its reconceptualization of canonical preoccupations. We will begin with an analysis of speculative fiction, both Indigenous “wonderworks” and Afrofuturism, to explore the traumas of settler-colonialism, Indigenous resurgence, cross-cultural solidarity, and environmental sustainability. We will continue with a critique of the Canadian wilderness to examine how women, madness, and criminality complicate gendered constructions of the North and the adventure narrative. The course will close with a discussion of postmodernism in Canada, specifically its evolving relationship with God, humanism, and history.

Required Reading: Cherie Dimaline, The Marrow Thieves (DCB); Wayde Compton, The Outer Harbour (Arsenal); Elizabeth Hay, Late Nights on Air (McClelland&Stewart); Gil Adamson, The Outlander (Anansi); Yann Martel, The Life of Pi (Vintage); Chester Brown, Louis Riel: A Comic-Strip Biography (Drawn&Quarterly).

Fiction available at the University of Toronto Bookstore (214 College Street, 416-640-7900).

First Three Authors and Texts: Dimaline, Compton, Hay

Method of Evaluation: Take-home test (25%); Essay—8 pages (40%); Final exam—2 hours (25%); Participation (10%).


ENG365H1S - Contemporary American Fiction

Section Number: LEC0101

Time(s): Monday & Wednesday 2pm-5pm ONLINE SYNCHRONOUS

Instructor(s): Scott Rayter

Brief Description of Course: How do contemporary American fiction writers deal with the politics of representation in their works, particularly in relation to identity—be it national, sexual, gender, ethnic, or racial—and within a larger postmodern context of questioning subjectivity itself? 

Required Reading: Works will include only recent 21st-century novels and short stories by writers such as George Saunders, Lorrie Moore, Carmen Maria Machado, Alison Bechdel, Colson Whitehead, Ha Jin, Nathan Englander, Jhumpa Lahiri, and Tommy Orange.

First Three Authors and Texts: Machado, Saunders, Moore

Method of Evaluation: Take-home Passage Analysis (20%); Essay (35%); Take-home Exam (30%); Participation (15%)


ENG371H1S - Topics in Indigenous, Postcolonial, Transnational Literatures

Section Number

Time(s): Monday & Wednesday 12pm - 3pm

Instructor(s): TBA

Brief Description of Course: TBA

Required Reading: TBA 

First Three Authors and Texts: TBA

Method of Evaluation: TBA


ENG376H1F - Topics in Theory, Language, Critical Methods: Narrative Theory

Section Number

Time(s): Monday & Wednesday 10am - 1pm

Instructor(s): Daniel Newman

Brief Description of Course: What is narrative? How does it work? How do the elements of a narrative combine to affect readers aesthetically, emotionally, ideologically? These are some of the questions asked by narrative theory (or narratology). More specifically, it asks questions like, “How and why are the events in this story arranged in this particular order?” and “How do narrators control the flow of knowledge and information?” Narratology thus provides a useful framework for students interested in reading, analyzing or even writing narrative literature (including fiction, narrative nonfiction, film, comics, drama and even some poetry and music). It also works very nicely with other critical or theoretical approaches to literature: some of the great works of feminist and Marxist literary theory, for example, simultaneously use and contribute to narratology. 

This course covers the building blocks of narrative and some of its key techniques, focusing on character, event, plot, narration (including unreliable and weird narrators), time (including impossible temporalities) and more. Our theory focus will always be grounded in real texts, all of them short: short stories and nonfiction narratives, journalism, film, comics, music videos, and many other media. You're encouraged to suggest additional short narratives that strike them as interesting from a technical/formal perspective. 

Required Reading: The reading (and viewing) list will be composed of several short texts, most of them short stories (but also journalism, nonfiction, film, comics, music videos and other media). All readings and videos on the syllabus are available free online, either through the University of Toronto libraries (UTL) or elsewhere. 

The exact texts will be announced before the course begins, but they will include mainly modern and contemporary works by authors and directors including Margaret Atwood, Raymond Carver, Ted Chiang, Teju Cole, Roald Dahl, Shirley Jackson, Jamaica Kincaid, Thomas King, David Lynch, Sarah Polley, Namwali Serpell, Bill Watterson and many more. 

First Three Authors and Texts: Margaret Atwood, “Happy Endings”; Raymond Carver, “So Much Water So Close to Home”; the Brothers Grimm, “Rapunzel”

Method of Evaluation: Method of Evaluation: Three Short Textual Analyses + One Creative-Analytical Assignment (60%, based on top three of four grades); Take-Home Test (25%); Participation (15%) 

ENG480H1F - Advanced Studies Seminar: TBA

Section Number: L5101

Time(s): Tuesday & Thursday 6pm - 8pm

Instructor(s): TBA

Brief Description of Course: TBA

Required Reading: TBA 

First Three Authors and Texts: TBA

Method of Evaluation: TBA


ENG481H1S - Advanced Studies Seminar: Canadian Speculative Fiction

Section Number: L0101

Time(s): Tuesday & Thursday 2pm - 4pm

Instructor(s): Vikki Visvis

Brief Description of Course: If speculation beyond the directly observable natural world is the hallmark of speculative fiction, then, the emphasis on realism in historical surveys of Canadian fiction means the elision of genres such as science fiction, fantasy, and horror. However, Canadian literature betrays a marked commitment to speculative fiction, from Margaret Atwood’s now archetypal feminist dystopia The Handmaid’s Tale to the inception of cyberpunk with William Gibson’s Neuromancer. This course will specifically examine how works of Canadian speculative fiction respond to three timely issues: American socio-politics, Canadian settler-colonialism, and experiential displacement. We will begin by appraising how Canadian futuristic dystopian narratives offer critiques of and convey anxieties about the socio-political dynamics of their US neighbours, whether in terms of misogyny, reproductive rights, religious extremism, totalitarianism, terrorism, biological warfare, a second American Civil War, and climate change. We will continue by evaluating how Indigenous “wonderworks,” Indigiqueer speculative fiction, and Afrofuturism not only uncover Canada’s own problematic history of residential schooling, two-spirit discrimination, anti-Black racism, and ghettoization but also celebrate the power of cultural resurgence to combat settler-colonial legacies. The course will close by considering how post-apocalyptic pandemic settings and the genre of cyberpunk display the dynamics of displacement and alienation, be it as a stateless refugee or as post-human. Ultimately, by investigating the ways Canadian speculative fiction responds to American socio-politics, marginalized cultures, and conditions of displacement, this course exposes how fantastic worlds are far from escapist avoidance; they are, in fact, vehicles for new forms of critical engagement that educate us about our immediate reality and enable us to navigate our future. 

Required Reading: Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid’s Tale; Omar El Akkad, American War; Cherie Dimaline The Marrow Thieves; Nalo Hopkinson, Brown Girl in the Ring; Emily St. John Mandel, Station Eleven; William Gibson, Neuromancer; short stories by Adam Garnet Jones, Kai Minosh Pyle, Mari Kurisato, and Nazbah Tom from Love After the End: An Anthology of Two-Spirit and Indigiqueer Speculative Fiction, Ed. Joshua Whitehead.  

First Three Authors and Texts: Margaret Atwood, Omar El Akkad, Cherie Dimaline

Method of Evaluation: Five short response assignments (1-2 pages each) 15%; Participation 10%; Seminar presentation (15 minutes) 20%; Essay proposal and annotated bibliography 20%; Final long essay (15-18 pages) 35%. 


ENG485H1F - Advanced Studies Seminar: Staging Islam in Early modern England

Section Number: L5101

Time(s): Tuesday & Thursday 4pm - 6pm

Instructor(s): Katherine Williams

Brief Description of Course: TBA

Required Reading: TBA 

First Three Authors and Texts: TBA

Method of Evaluation: TBA